Treasure Chest Workbook Answers Poem 5 A Doctor’s Journal Entry for August 6, 1945

Treasure Chest Workbook Answers Poem 5 A Doctor's Journal Entry for August 6, 1945

Treasure Chest Workbook Answers Poem 5 A Doctor’s Journal Entry for August 6, 1945

A Doctor’s Journal Entry for August 6, 1945 Poem Comprehension Questions Answers

Question 1.
Read the following verse paragraph and answer the questions that follow:
The morning stretched calm, beautiful, and warm
Sprawling half-clad, I gazed out at the form
of shimmering leaves and shadows. Suddenly
A strong flash, then another, startled me.

i. What was the morning like? What was the doctor doing?
ii. What startled him?
ii. How the world around him changed within moment?
iv. What happened to the clothes of the doctor?
Answer:
i. The morning was calm, beautiful and warm. Looking out of his window, the doctor sees the shining leaves and shadows. The doctor however was relaxing. He was partly dressed.

ii. The two consecutive flashes simply terrified the doctor. The brightly lit stone lantern reminded him of magnesium flares, generally seen during war.

iii. The two consecutive flashes simply changed the world. While wondering about the flares, the doctor finds the entire world Crashed and crumbled around him. Dust swirls around him as soon as the roofs and walls of his house begin to tumble down. The doctor is even more terrified.

iv. We come to know that the clothes which the doctor was wearing, his drawers and undershirt, disappeared within moment. In other words, the clothes of the doctor were burnt to his utter dismay.

Question 2.
Read the following verse paragraph and answer the questions that follow:
My right side bled, my cheeks were torn, and
I Dislodged, detachedly, a piece of glass,
All the time wondering what had come to pass.
Where was my wife? Alarmed, I gave a shout.

i. Why did the right side of the doctor bleed?
ii. Why did the doctor give a shout?
iii. What is the name of the doctor’s wife? How did she appear?
iv. How did the doctor console his wife? What did he do then?
v. What did the doctor and his wife find soon as come out in the street? What was their reaction?
vi. What did they see when they stood afraid in street?
Answer:
i. The doctor was badly injured when a splinter pierced his right thigh. It however protruded from his thigh and blood gushed out from there.

ii. The doctor was highly terrified when he was reminded of his wife. He wondered where she was at that time. Hence, he gave a shout to call her at once.

iii. The name of the doctor’s wife is Yecko-san. She appears holding her elbow, terrified like her doctor husband. She looks pale and was bloodstained because of being injured.

iv. The doctor consoles her saying that they will be fine but; they must go out immediately so as to save themselves from being buried under their collapsing house.

v. Soon as they came out in the street, the doctor and his wife stumbled against the head of a man, crushed to death under a gate. They were so shocked that they failed to move.

vi. While they stood shocked in the street, they saw a house before them which tilted at first. It then swayed and finally crushed down on the ground. Fire was seen blazing up all of a sudden in the dust and spreading all around with the help of wind.

Question 3.
Read the following verse paragraph and answer the questions that follow:
It dawned on us we must
Get to the hospital: we needed aid —
And I should help my staff too. (Though this made
Sense to me then, I wonder how I could.
My legs gave way. I sat down on the ground.

i. What dawned on them?
ii. Give two reasons why they wanted to go to the hospital.
ii. The doctor says, “I wonder how I could”. What did he wonder? ‘
iv. What were the other problems the doctor faced at that moment?
v. How did he recover? Did he able to go to the hospital?
Answer:
i. Because of being injured when their house collapsed as a result of atomic explosion, both the doctor and his wife were perplexed for some time. They failed to decide what to do immediately. But ultimately, the doctor realised that they must rush to the hospital for medical aid.

ii. The doctor and his wife were badly injured when their house collapsed as a result of atomic explosion. Hence, it was necessary for them to rush to the hospital for medical aid. Next, the doctor also thought that he could also help his staff by rendering service to the people injured in the blast.

iii. Despite his urgent need in the hospital, the doctor wondered how to reach there. His legs were already numbed with pain and he was thus, forced to sit down on the ground, failing to move ahead.

iv. Besides his fatal wound in his legs, the doctor also felt thirsty. But there was no water to drink. Moreover, he was badly exhausted due to profuse blood loss. He was feeling breathless as a result of exhaustion.

v. The doctor sat down on the ground being completely exhausted. He took quick short breath and regained his strength after a while.

Question 4.
Read the following verse paragraph and answer the questions that follow:
A dreadful loneliness
Came over me when she had gone. My mind
Ran at high speed, my body crept behind.
I saw the shadowy forms of people, some
Were ghosts, some scarecrows, all were wordless and
dumb

i. Who is she referred to in the given excerpt? Where had she gone?
ii. What did the doctor see around him while he was sitting alone?
iii. How did the people walk towards the hospital?
iv. Why did they walk with the arms stretched straight out?
v. Did the doctor understand at a first sight that why they were walking so strangely?
Answer:
i. She is Yecko-san, the wife of the doctor. On her husband’s ardent request, Yecko-san went to the hospital, leaving the doctor alone in the street.

ii. The doctor saw some bizarre-looking men, walking down the street. They were so worn out that they looked either like ghosts or scarecrows.

iii. the doctor watched the people walking in a naked pa-rade to the hospital. While they were walking, their arms were either stretched out or their hands dangled loosely from their body.

iv. Since these men were badly burnt in the explosion, their arms were either stretched out or their hands, dangled loosely from their body so as to avoid friction on their wounds.

v. At first the doctor wondered why these men were walking so strangely. But, after a while he realised that they were badly burnt in the explosion. To avoid their flesh being rubbed off against each other, they thus walked with their arms either stretched out or hands, dangling loosely from their body.

Question 5.
Read the following verse paragraph and answer the questions that follow:
I turned my gaze, but was at a loss
That she should stand thus, till I came across 
A naked man – and now the thought arose
That some strange thing had stripped us of clothes.

i. Why did the doctor turn his gaze?
ii. What did he think initially when he saw a woman with a child standing naked in his path? How did he clear off his misunderstanding?
iii. What did the doctor see after he came across a naked man?
iv. What does the poet intend to show through the series of devastating pictures.
Answer:
i. The doctor saw a woman with a child, standing naked in his path. Hence, he turned his gaze away from them.

ii. Seeing the naked woman and her naked child, the doctor at first presumed that they have come out straight from bath. But noticing a naked man before him, he finally realised that some dreadful thing had happened because of which people’s clothes were burnt.

iii. After he came across a naked man, the doctor saw an old woman, lying on the ground. Her face was disfigured with deep anguish. Yet she remained silent.

iv. With a series of horrifying pictures, Vikram Seth shows how the entire human civilization is at stake during war. The idea is reinforced by a constant emphasis upon nudity in the poem. The Doctor feels unashamed being naked. So too are other people in the city. It seems as if the entire city is marching away from civilization and moving towards an uncertain future which promises nothing but eternal horror and pain.

A Doctor’s Journal Entry for August 6, 1945 Poem Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs)

Question 1.
The poem is about
a. Kargil war
b. Gulf War
c. aftermath of nuclear attack in Hiroshima
d. World War
Answer:
c. aftermath of nuclear attack in Hiroshima

Question 2.
Who is the speaker of the poem?
a. Yecko-san, the wife of the doctor
b. the poet
c. a warrior
d. the doctor
Answer:
d. the doctor

Question 3.
What fascinated the doctor when he looked out of the window?
a. the shining leaves and the shadows
b. the beautiful birds all around
c. the beautiful sunset
d. the glorious rainbow
Answer:
a. the shining leaves and the shadows

Question 4.
What terrified the doctor all of a sudden?
a. the cry of his wife, Yecko-san
b. the two consecutive strong flashes
c. the thunderstorm
d. the accident on the road
Answer:
b. the two consecutive strong flashes

Question 5.
What happened to the roof and walls of the doctor’s house?
a. they became damp
b. they remained unaffected
c. they collapsed
d. the walls only cracked
Answer:
c. they collapsed

Question 6.
What happened to the drawers and undershirt of the doctor?
a. nothing happened
b. they were covered with dust
c. they turned black
d. they disappeared
Answer:
d. they disappeared

Question 7.
What was the condition of the doctor after the sudden blast?
a. he was at home so nothing happened to him
b. he was only shocked
c. he was bleeding and was badly injured
d. only his clothes were dirty
Answer:
c. he was bleeding and was badly injured

Question 8.
How did Yecko-san emerge?
a. she emerged with a towel in her hand
b. she emerged holding her elbow
c. she emerged crying loudly
d. she emerged being unaffected
Answer:
b. she emerged holding her elbow

Question 9.
Why did the doctor fall on the street?
a. because the street was slippery
b. because he bumped over a human head
c. because he was stumbling
d. because the street was dark
Answer:
b. because he bumped over a human head

Question 10.
What happened to the house which stood before the speaker?
a. it remained unaffected
b. it titlted, swayed, toppled and crashed
c. it was burnt to ashes
d. it collapsed
Answer:
b. it titlted, swayed, toppled and crashed

Question 11.
Where did the doctor decide to go?
a. hospital
b. bank
c. open space
d. bunker
Answer:
a. hospital

Question 12.
Why did the doctor sit on the ground?
a. because the road was blocked
b. because his legs gave way
c. because his wife didn’t want him to move ahead
d. because he had no where to go
Answer:
b. because his legs gave way

Question 13.
Why a soldier gave a towel to the doctor?
a. to clean his blood stained face
b. because he was sweating profusely
c. because he was naked
d. because the doctor needed it to dress his wound
Answer:
c. because he was naked

Question 14.
How did the doctor feel when his wife advanced towards hospital leaving him on the street?
a. he felt relaxed
b. a dreadful loneliness came over him
c. he was annoyed
d. he was shocked
Answer:
b. a dreadful loneliness came over him

A Doctor’s Journal Entry for August 6, 1945 Poem Annotations with Comments

Lines 1 to 10:

stretched: spread
sprawling: stretching (gleaming) shining with soft light
Shimmering: spread;
startled: shocked
flares: bright flame
timber: wood used in Construction
debris: wreckage, garbage
swirled: whirled (moved in a circular motion)
weird: strange, odd, bizarre
disappeared: burnt (in this context)

Comment:

The poem begins with a picture of a beautiful morning with shimmering leaves”. But the sudden strong flashes disrupts everything. The serene nature is ravished along with the city, where people are seen wounded and running naked in the street. The picture is deeply pathetic and reminds us of the picture of Hiroshima on 6th August, 1945, the blackest day in human history, on which the poem is based on. In other words, the poem describes the aftermath of nuclear attack in Hiroshima, by the United States during the final stages of World War II.

Lines 11 to 18:

splinter: fragment of wood or glass
jutted: protruded
mangled: mutildted
dislodged: removed
detachedly: removed
alarmed: terribly frigttened
gushed out: flowed out
panic stricken: terrified

Lines 19 to 29:

bloodstained: marked with blood
stumbling: staggering
tripped: stumbled
tilted: slanted
toppled: collapsed
dawned on us: suddenly came to our mind
aid: help

Lines 30 to 45:

how I could: since he is badly injured, it is impossible to help his staff
legs gave way: legs could not go ahead
gave way: felt weak and numb
revive: renew
stiff: hard
rebelled: opposed
distress: suffering
dreadful: awful
mind: thoughts
crept behind: left back.

Comment:

I was still naked…no shame: War destroys everything. The entire human civilization is at stake during war. The poet draws such a picture of war by constantly emphasizing upon nudity in the poem. The Doctor feels unashamed being naked. So too are other people in the city. It seems as if the entire city s marching away from civilization and moving towards an uncertain future which promises nothing but eternal horror and pain

Lines 46 to 63:

Scarecrows: actually it means human figures made of sticks and placed in green field to scare away crows. But here the word means messy human figures arms stretched
straight out: their hands were stretched out since their skin was so burnt
dangling: hanging
friction: rubbing
chafe: rub
shuffled: moved
shuffled in blank parade: walked slowly in trance dismayech saddened
marred: ruined.

A Doctor’s Journal Entry for August 6, 1945 Poem Paraphrase

Lines 1 to 6:

The beautiful morning wakes up the doctor. Looking out of the window, he sees the shining leaves and shadows. Suddenly, the two consecutive strong flashes terrify him in a major way. The old stone lantern blazes up and the doctor wonders whether the two flashes are magnesium flares, generally seen during war.

Lines 6 to 17:

While wondering about the flares, the doctor is even more shocked seeing the roof and wall of the building collapsed and the debris, scattered all over. Moreover, dust swirls around him and the drawers and under shirt of the doctor is burnt within moment. A splinter protrudes from his thigh and the doctor is severely injured. Blood sprouts out from his right side.

His cheek is torn. He removes a piece of glass struck in his body, wondering what has happened to him. Suddenly he is reminded of his wife. The doctor is at once terrified. He hollers with all his might to call his wife, Yecko-san. Blood continues streaming out from his body and he wonders whether a big artery in his neck is fatally injured.

Lines 17 to 35:

Yecko-san finally shows up, holding her elbow, when the doctor calls her again. Like her husband, Yecko-san is also terrified. The doctor assures her that they will be fine but; they must go out immediately. While they walk on the street, they stumble against the head of a man, crushed to death under a gate. They are so shocked that they fail to move.

A house before them at first tilts, then sways and finally crushes down on the ground. Fire is seen blazing up all of a sudden in the dust and it spreads all around with the help of wind. The doctor, shocked to see the horrible spectacle all around him, finally decides to go to hospital. They badly need medical aid as they are severely injured.

Even he can help his staffs there. But he wonders how to reach the hospital with his legs, already numbed with pain. The doctor sits down on the ground, failing to move ahead. He is thirsty. But there is no water to drink. Sitting on the ground he takes a quick short breath and regains his strength after a while.

Lines 35 to 45:

The doctor rises up, soon as he regains strength. He is still naked. Yet he is not ashamed. This thought disturbs him until he meets a soldier, standing by the side. The soldier offers him a towel, taken out from around his neck. The doctor fails to move ahead. His legs are stiffened with dried blood. He asks his wife to go alone to the hospital. Yecko-san feels reluctant to leave her husband. But ultimately she leaves him behind, finding no better option. After her departure, the doctor feels terribly lonely.

Lines 46 to 51:

Some bizarre looking men are seen walking down the street. They are so worn out that they look either like ghosts or scarecrows. They are all waking silently with their arms, either stretched out or hands dangling loosely from their body. The doctor wonders why they are walking so strangely. The next moment he realises that they are avoiding their flesh to be rubbed off against each other. After all thqy are burnt and the friction on their wounds will definitely plague them a lot.

Lines 47 to 63:

People are also seen walking in a naked parade to the hospital. The doctor discovers a woman with a child, both of whom are naked. The doctor wonders whether they have come out straight after bath. He then sees another naked man.

He realises that some dreadful thing has happened because of which people’s clothes are burnt. An old woman is also seen lying on the ground. Her face is disfigured with deep anguish. Yet she remained silent. In fact silence seems to be the common feature of everyone in the street.

A Doctor’s Journal Entry for August 6, 1945 Poem Summary by Vikram Seth

Vikram Seth’s A Doctor’s Journal Entry for August 6, 1945 describes the aftermath of nuclear attack in Hiroshima, by the United States during the final stages of World War II. The poem is in the form of an entry made in a journal by a doctor, who is himself badly wounded because of the explosion of atom bomb. What he sees around him is the spectacle of horror which simply terrifies the doctor. The poem is indeed a deeply moving picture of nuclear holocaust.

The poem begins on a calm note. The Doctor wakes up and sees a beautiful morning from outside his window. Suddenly, the two consecutive strong flashes terrify him in a major way. The roof and the wall of the building collapse all of a sudden and dust swirls around him. A splinter protrudes from his thigh and blood sprouts up from his right side.

His cheek is torn: He removes a piece of glass struck in his body, wondering what has happened to him. Suddenly he is reminded of his wife. The doctor is at once terrified. He hollers with all his might to calls his wife, Yecko-san.

Yecko-san finally appears holding her elbow. Like her husband, she is also terrified. The doctor assures her that they will be fine but; they must go out immediately. While they walk on the street, they stumble against the head of a man, crushed to death under a gate. They are so shocked that they fail to move. A house before them at first tilts then sways and finally crushes down on the ground. Fire is seen blazing up all of a sudden in the dust and it spreads all around with the help of wind.

The doctor shocked to see the horrible spectacle all around him, finally decides to go to hospital. But he fails to walk ahead since his legs are numbed with pain. The doctor sits down on the ground, takes quick short, breath and regains his strength after a while. He then endeavours to walk, but fails again since his legs are stiffened with dried blood. He asks his wife to go alone to the hospital. And after she leaves, the doctor feels terribly lonely.

Some bizarre looking men are seen walking down the street. They are so worn out that they look either like ghosts or scarecrows. They are all walking silently with their arms, either stretched out or hands dangling loosely from their body. The doctor wonders why they are walking so strangely. The next moment he realises that they are avoiding their flesh to be rubbed off against each other. After all they are burnt and the friction on their wounds will definitely plague them a lot.

People are also seen walking in a naked parade to the hospital. The doctor spots out a woman with a child, both of whom are naked. The doctor wonders whether they have come out straight after bath. He then sees another naked man. He realises that some dreadful thing has happened because of which people’s clothes are burnt.

With all these pathetic picture, the poet shows how the entire human civilization is at stake during war. The idea is reinforced by a constant emphasis upon nudity in the poem. The Doctor feels unashamed being naked. So too are other people in the city. It seems as if the entire city is marching away from civilization and moving towards an uncertain future which promises nothing but eternal horror and pain.

A Doctor’s Journal Entry for August 6, 1945 Poem Introduction

Vikram Seth’s A Doctor’s Journal Entry for August 6, 1945 describes the aftermath of nuclear attack in Hiroshima, by the United States during the final stages of World War II. The poem is in the form of an entry made in a journal by a doctor, who is himself badly wounded because of the explosion of atom bomb. What he sees around him is the spectacle of horror which simply terrifies the doctor. The poem is indeed a deeply moving picture of nuclear holocaust.

Treasure Chest A Collection of ICSE Poems Workbook Answers

Treasure Chest Workbook Answers Poem 4 The Night Mail

Treasure Chest Workbook Answers Poem 4 The Night Mail

Treasure Chest Workbook Answers Poem 4 The Night Mail

The Night Mail Poem Comprehension Questions Answers

Question 1.
Read the following verse paragraph and answer the questions that follow:
This is the night mail crossing the Border,
Bringing the cheque and the postal order,
Letters for the rich, letters for the poor, 
The shop at the corner, the girl next door. 
Pulling up Beattock, a steady climb:
The gradient against her, but she’s on time.
Past cotton grass and moorland boulder
Shovelling white steam over her shoulder,
snort noisily as she passes

i. Which border is the night nail crossing? What does it bring to the people?
ii. What does the poet mean when he says that the night mail brings letter to poor and rich?
iii. How is the night mail personified?
iv. What type of landscape does the poet mention in the given excerpt?
v. How does the night mail pass through the landscape mentioned in the given excerpt?
Answer:
i. The “border” mentioned in the given excerpt is the border between England and Scotland. The night mail however brings a variety of letters to a variety of people.

ii. The night mail is represented as a perfect communist who doesn’t discriminate between poor and the riches. This is evident when the poet says that the train brings “Letters for the rich, letters for the poor”, which however indicates that the service rendered by the night mail is not restricted to the privileged class only.

iii. Throughout the poem, Auden personifies the night mail as a woman. The train however shares the elegance of a woman while it passes smoothly without disturbing the world around. This is evident when the poet says that while the train passes, “no one wakes”. The smooth manner which the train maintains ail throughout its journey is certainly a feminine quality for which the train is referred to as she.

iv. In the given excerpt, the train is seen crossing the cotton fields and the rocky land. It covers a long distance unmoved of everything around.

v. Auden lends a conventional picture of the night mail crossing the cotton field and the rocky land with a rumbling noise. Moreover, white steam gushes out from her shoulder while the train moves on.

Question 2.
Read the following verse paragraph and answer the questions that follow:
Birds turn their heads as she approaches,
Stare from bushes at her blank-faced coaches.
Sheep-dogs cannot turn her course;
They slumber on with paws across.
In the farm she passes no one wakes,
But a jug in a bedroom gently shakes.

i. Why do birds turn their heads? Wherefrom they turn their heads?
ii. What is meant by blank-faced coaches? Why do birds stare at the blank-faced coaches?
iii. How do sheep dogs react while the night mail passes on?
iv. Why no one wakes when the night mail passes on through the farm?
v. What happens in the bedroom while the night mail passes on?
Answer:
i. Hearing the rumbling sound of the approaching train, birds turn their heads to see the night mail moving on elegantly. They however turn their heads from the bushes around.

ii. Blank faced coaches refers to the black and vacant coaches uninhabited by humans. Birds however continue staring at the blank-faced coaches sine they are surprised finding no human figures inside.

iii. Sheep-dogs, continues sleeping comfortably with crossed-legs while the night mail passes by. Generally sheep-dogs are sensitive animals. They get up even with slightest noise. But, the rumbling sound of the night mail hardly bothers them since they are used to hearing such noise and assured that the train will do no harm to them.

iv. Like the sheep-dogs, human too are used to hearing the snort of the night mail. Hence, they continue enjoying their sleep while the night mail passes by.

v. Though humans and animals continue sleeping, unmoved of the passing of the night mail, the jug in the bed room responds with a mild shake. In other words, the mild tremor caused while the train passes on, shakes the jug inside a bedroom.

Question 3.
Read the following verse paragraph and answer the questions that follow:
Dawn freshens, Her climb is done.
Down towards Glasgow she descend,
Towards the steam tugs yelping down a glade of cranes
Towards the fields of apparatus, the furnaces
Set on the dark plain like gigantic chessmen.
All Scotland waits for her:
In dark glens, beside pale-green lochs
Men long for news.

i. Whose climb is referred to in the given excerpt? What happens with the leap of dawn?
ii. Describe in brief the landscape of Glasgow as painted by the poet.
iii. What does the poet mean by all Scotland?
iv. Which areas of Glasgow does the train crosses in the given excerpt?
Answer:
i. The night mail’s difficult path of moving along a sharp rise is referred to in the given excerpt. With the leap of dawn, the night mail descends down towards Glasgow and runs through the plain land.

ii. In the given excerpt, the poet explores the industrial landscape of Glasgow through which the night mail passes in the morning. Auden records that the night mail crosses the rows of cranes along the harbour of Glasgow. The next moment, it travels through the vast industrial areas where the furnaces look like gigantic chessmen.

iii. All Scotland in the given excerpt refers to the people of Scotland who are eagerly waiting for the night mail so that their letters be delivered on time.

iv. The night mail passes through the industrial landscape of Glasgow evident from the pictures like “the fields of apparatus, the furnaces / Set on the dark plain like gigantic chessmen.” In other words, the poet refers to the vast industrial areas of Glasgow where there are furnaces that look like gigantic chessmen.

Question 4.
Read the following verse paragraph and answer the questions that follow:
Letters of thanks, letters from banks,
Letters of joy from girl and boy,
Receipted bills and invitations
To inspect new stock or to visit relations,
And applications for situations,
And timid lovers ‘declarations,’
And gossip, gossip from all the nations,

i. What kind of letters does the night mail deliver to the people?
ii. Why are holiday photograph sent to the recipients?
iii. How does the poet describe the tone and style of the letters?
iv. Name the various colours of paper used to write the letters mentioned in the poem?
v. Are there only handwritten letters posted to the recipients? What does the night mail carry other than letters?
Answer:
i. However, the train brings a variety of letters to a variety of people. There are letters expressing thanks or joy, love letters, letters of gossip, letters accompanied with holiday photographs, letter from uncles, cousins, aunts, letter expressing sympathy all stuffed together to be delivered to the people of Scotland.

ii. Holiday photographs are sent to be enlarged and kept as a memoir of beautiful moment of life.

iii. The variety of letters that the night mail carries are written in various tones and styles imaginable. Such tones and styles are mischievous, tedious, emotional, clever and unintelligent to name a few. Moreover, some of the letters are typed while others are printed and even misspelled.

iv. A wide range of letters carried by the night mail are written on papers of various colours. The colours mentioned by the poet are pink, violet, white and blue.

v. Along with the handwritten letters, there are also letters which are typed. Moreover, there are also printed letters among the lot.

Question 5.
Read the following verse paragraph and answer the questions that follow:
They continue their dreams,
But shall wake soon and hope for letters,
And none will hear the postman’s knock
Without a quickening of the heart,
For who can bear to feel himself forgotten?

i. Who are they referred to in the first line of the given excerpt? What are they doing?
ii. What kind of dream they see while in their sleep?
iii. What will they do after they wake up? Why?
iv. How will they react hearing the postman knocking at their door?
Answer:
i. They in the given excerpt refer to the people of Scotland who remain fast asleep even when the train arrives with letters for them in the early morning.

ii. Thousands remain asleep and have terrifying dreams. The poet says that their dreams are as dreaming of monsters. In a way, the dream seems to be something of dreadful nature due to the political unrest in Europe.

iii. After waking up from their sleep the people of Scotland will wait for the letters to be delivered to them in proper time. This is because of the inherent nature of humans to remain connected to the world around. After all none can endure the pain of being forgotten.

iv. After waking up from sleep the people of Scotland will wait for the letters to be delivered to them in proper time. And the moment they will hear the postman knocking at their door, their hearts will pound due to.

The Night Mail Poem Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs)

Question 1.
The night mail is heading towards?
a. London
b. Glasgow
c. Paris
d. Belgium
Answer:
b. Glasgow

Question 2.
The night mail is personified as a ………….
a. child
b. man
c. woman
d. none of the above
Answer:
c. woman

Question 3.
Who turns towards the night mail when it passes by?
a. humans
b. birds
c. sheep-dogs
d. cows
Answer:
c. sheep-dogs

Question 4.
What do humans do when the night-mail passes by?
a. they enjoy watching the train
b. they sleep
c. they wait anxiously for the train to stop
d. they stop the train in the middle
Answer:
b. they sleep

Question 5.
What shakes in the bedroom while the train passes by?
a. mug
b. water bottle
c. lamp
d. jug
Answer:
d. jug

Question 6.
In the morning the train descend down to
a. London
b. Glasgow
c. Birmingham
d. Inverness
Answer:
b. Glasgow

Question 7.
While in their sleep people dream of
a. fairies
b. letters
c. money
d. monsters
Answer:
d. monsters

Question 8.
When do people experience a pounding heart?
a. when the night mail arrives
b. immediately after they wake up
c. the moment when they get letters
d. the moment when the post man knock at their doors
Answer:
d. the moment when the post man knock at their doors

Question 9.
The furnaces set on dark plain look like
a. monsters
b. citadels
c. gigantic chessmen
d. None of the above
Answer:
c. gigantic chessmen

Question 10.
Which among these is not carried by the night mail?
a. letters
b. cheques
c. postal order
d. telegrams
Answer:
d. telegrams

The Night Mail Poem Annotations with Comments

Stanza I:

border: refers to the border of England and Scotland
cheque: an order to a bank to pay a stated sum from the drawer’s account
rich: rich people
poor: poor people
Pulling up: mounting up
Gradient: slope
Beattock: A village in Dumfries and Galloway council area, Scotland
Moorland: high land with rough grass and bushes.
Boulder: rock
Shovelling: emitting
Snorting: make a sudden explosive sound

Comment:

snort noisily ….of wind-bent grasses: Throughout the poem, the night mail is personified as a woman. Auden often refers the night mail as “she” who “snort noisily” and crosses the “Silent miles of wind-bent grasses.” “All Scotland waits for her”, as she brings news for all. International news was significantly important due to Hitler’s meteoric rise to power.

Stanza II:

turn their heads: birds turn their head when they hear the night mail crossing with rumbling sound
she: refers to the night mail
blank-faced: black and vacant coaches
Sheep-dogs: a dog of a breed suitable for guarding and herding sheep.
Slumber: sleep
Paws across: cross-legged
No one wakes: all are fast asleep when the night mail passes by
Shakes: jug in a bedroom vibrates due to the tremor caused when the night mail passes by.

Comment:

Sheep-dogs cannot turn her course: Sheep-dogs are a part of the sleeping community which remains unmoved while the train passes by. Generally sheep-dogs are sensitive animals. They get up even with slightest noise. But, the rumbling sound of the night mail hardly bothers them like the humans who are used to hearing the noise of the train passing by. Hence, the sheep-dogs continues enjoying their sleep like humans.

Stanza III:

Dawn: early morning
Her climb is done: the train has completed covering the difficult path of climbing up on the mountains.
Descends: come down
Yelping: here it refers to the rumbling sound of the train
Glade: Of space Towards the steam.
of cranes: the rows of cranes along the harbour of Glasgow
the fields of apparatus: fields of industries
chessmen: solid figure used as a chess piece. Set on ….. gigantic
chessmen: heads toward dark furnaces set up like gigantic chessmen.
All Scotland: all the people of Scotland
glens: a narrow valley, especially in Scotland
lochs: a lake

Stanza IV:

Receipted: a written a knowledgment of having received
Stock: store
applications for situations: application for vacant post
gossip: rumours
circumstantial: detail
snaps: pictures
condolence: sympathy
hue: colour
catty: mischievous
heart’s outpouring: heart’s outburst

Stanza V:

Dreaming of terrifying monsters: indication of disturbed sleep due to dreaming something dreadful
Cranston: A locality and parish in Midlothian council area,Scotland.
Aberdeen: a city in North East Scotland, on the North Sea
quickening of the heart: pounding of the heart

The Night Mail Poem Paraphrase

Stanza I:

The night mail is crossing the border and heading towards Scotland. Laden with letters, bank cheques and postal orders meant for all classes of people, the train is committed to reach on time. The path however is difficult since it isn’t easy to move along a sharp rise with hurdles and obstacles on its way. While on move, the night mail crosses the cotton fields and the rocky land. It covers a long distance unmoved of everything around. The poet fancies the train as a woman puffing out noisily and releasing steam from her shoulder while passing by the miles of verdant lands.

Stanza II:

Birds from the bushes turn towards the approaching train while they hear the rumbling sound. The dark and vacant coaches surprise them as they see no human figures. Sheep-dogs, continues sleeping comfortably with crossed-legs as they are used to hearing the noise of the train passing by. Humans too are unmoved. Like the sheep-dogs, they too enjoy their sleep while the train passes on with mild tremor that shakes a jug inside a bedroom.

Stanza III:

With the show of dawn, the train descends down towards Glasgow. The difficult path of moving along a sharp rise is over. The train now runs through the plain land with rows of cranes along the harbour of Glasgow. The next moment, it travels through the vast industrial areas where the furnaces look like gigantic chessmen. People of Scotland eagerly wait for the train as they long for news.

Stanza IV:

Various kinds of letters are received by the people of Scotland. It may be letters expressing thanks or joy or may be official letters from banks. There are applications for vacant post, love letters, letters of gossip, letters accompanied with holiday photographs, meant to be enlarged, letter from uncles, cousins, aunts, letter expressing sympathy written on papers of various colours like pink, violet, white and blue. The letters however have all tones and styles imaginable mischievous, tedious, emotional, clever and unintelligent. Some of them are typed while others are printed and even misspelled.

Stanza V:

Thousands remain asleep and have terrifying dreams. They are from Glasgow and Edinburgh. They continue with their dreams but expect that they will, ceive letters soon as they are awake. Their hearts will pound, hearing the postman knocking at their door. After all who can endure the pain of being forgotten?

The Night Mail Poem Summary by W.H. Auden

The night mail is crossing the border and heading towards Scotland. Laden with letters, bank cheques and postal orders meant for all classes of people, the train is committed to reach on time. The path however is difficult since it isn’t easy to move along a sharp rise with hurdles and obstacles on its way. While on move, the night mail crosses the cotton fields and the rocky land.

The poet fancies as if the night mail is a woman, puffing out noisily and releasing steam from her shoulder while passing by the miles of verdant lands. Birds from the bushes turn towards her while they hear the rumbling sound. The dark and vacant coaches surprise them as they see no human figures there. Sheep-dogs, continues sleeping comfortably with crossed-legs as they are used to hearing her noisy “snort”. Moreover, humans too remain unmoved. While they enjoy their sleep, the train passes on with mild tremor that shakes a jug inside a bedroom.

With the show of dawn, the train descends down towards Glasgow. The difficult path of moving along a sharp rise is over. The train now runs through the plain land with rows of cranes along the harbour of Glasgow. The next moment, it travels through the vast industrial areas where the furnaces look like gigantic chessmen. People of Scotland eagerly wait for the train as they crave for news.

However, the train brings a, variety of letters to a variety of people. There are “letters of thanks”, “letters from banks”; Letters of joy”; financial,” letters of gossip, love letters, letters from uncles, cousins, aunts and letters of condolence to name a few. These letters are written on papers of various colours like pink, violet, white and blue.

The letters however have all tones and styles imaginable mischievous, tedious, emotional, clever and unintelligent. Some of them are typed while others are printed and even misspelled. People who aren’t awake will receive letters soon as they are awake. Their hearts will pound, hearing the postman knocking at their door. After all who can endure the pain of being forgotten?

The Night Mail Poem Introduction

Auden’s Night Mail was written in 1936 to accompany the documentary film of the same title. The film was about a mail train flying from London to Scotland. Auden’s poem was read towards the end of the film, set to music by Benjamin Britten. The poem explores the commitment of a mail train to deliver an unimaginable variety of letters to the people of Scotland. Night Mail however remains one of Auden’s most popular poems all for its simple style and theme.

Treasure Chest A Collection of ICSE Poems Workbook Answers

Treasure Chest Workbook Answers Poem 3 I Remember, I Remember

Treasure Chest Workbook Answers Poem 3 I Remember, I Remember

Treasure Chest Workbook Answers Poem 3 I Remember, I Remember

I Remember, I Remember Poem Comprehension Questions Answers

Question 1.
Read the following verse paragraph and answer the questions that follow:
I remember, I remember,
The house where I was born,
The little window where the sun
Came peeping in at morn;
He never came a wink too soon,
Nor brought too long a day,
But now, I often wish the night
Had borne my breath away

i. What memory of his childhood does the poet record in the first stanza?
ii. What specific memory of his house does the poet still remember?
iii. How did the sun help into maintaining a perfect equilibrium between day and night?
iv. What does the poet wish now?
v. Why does the poet longs for death?
Answer:
i. The speaker recalls the memory of his childhood all throughout the poem. In the first stanza however he is reminiscent of the house where he was born. Specifically he remembers the small window through which the rays of sun ushered in the morning. During those days, the speaker says that the sun was a too punctual. He neither leaped up early nor prolonged the day by setting down late. In a way, the picture of his childhood days are simple and innocent.

ii. The poet specifically remembers the small window of the house where he was born. Through the window, the rays of sun ushered in the morning.

iii. The sun as described by the poet was too punctual during those days. He neither leaped up early in the morning nor prolonged the day by setting down late in the evening. Because of his punctuality, the equilibrium between day and night was well maintained by the sun.

iv. Due to being plagued down by the weight of misfortune and physical decline, the poet longs that the night takes away his breath and he never wake up to see the sun again. In other words, the poet is longing to be dead so as to escape the pains of life.

v. With old age, life becomes more complicated due to ill health as well as other misfortunes of life. During this time the zest for life is completely lost and often we long for death to escape further blows of life. The poet must have reached such stage of life where the urge to live more is completely lost. Hence he wishes to die as death means liberation from mundane sorrows.

Question 2.
Read the following verse paragraph and answer the questions that follow:
I remember, I remember,
The roses, red and white,
The violets, and the lily cups,
Those flowers made of light!
The lilacs where the robin built,
And where my brother set
The laburnum on his birthday, —
The tree is living yet!

i. Name the flowers which the poet still remembers.
ii. What does the poet mean by “flowers made of light”?
iii. Explain the imagery in this stanza.
iv. What is so special about the laburnum tree?
v. Explain the underlying meaning of the “tree is living yet”.
Answer:
i. The poet recollects a series of flowers which grew in his garden while in his childhood days. The flowers mentioned are red and white roses, the violets, lilies and lilacs.

ii. The colourful flowers grown ail around the garden looked so beautiful that the innocent mind of the poet fancied as if the flowers were blessed by heaven. The word “light” here means bright and shiny. The colourful flowers under bright sun shine looked so beautiful that the innocent mind of the poet considered it heavenly.

iii. The entire stanza is replete with sensuous images. The colourful flowers under bright sun rays, the robin’s nest, the laburnum tree all evoke a sensory experience in the reader. In fact, reader can literary imagine the flowers growing in the garden since the poet vividly describes them with a deliberate sensuous touch.

iv. The poet specifically remembers the laburnum tree which was once planted by his brother on his birthday. The tree however is still alive.

v. There might be two possible meanings of this expression. Firstly, it might suggest that th tree is still alive whereas the person who has planted it is no more alive. Secondly, the expression might suggest that while the tree is living and growing, the poet ¡s decaying. It is largely a matter of personal interpretation which reading to accept.

Question 3.
Read the following verse paragraph and answer the questions that follow:
I remember, I remember,
Where I was used to swing,
And thought the air must rush as fresh
To swallows on the wing;
My spirit flew in feathers then,
That is so heavy now,
And summer pool could hardly cool
The fever on my brow!

i. Describe the way the poet used to swing during his child hood.
ii. Which bird is mentioned in this stanza? Why does the poet mention the bird?
iii. What is meant by “spirit flew in feathers then”?
iv. What is “so heavy now”? Why?
v. Why does summer fail to heal the poet?
Answer:
i. Being lost of his vitality, the poet bemoans recalling the way he once swung with unimaginable rapidness. In his childhood days he used to swing expeditiously to feel the rush of fresh air all around.

ii. The bird mentioned in this stanza is swallow. The poet means to say that like the swallow, he was once carefree. His blithe childhood spirit was so light and boundless that it seemed to fly, in the air like the weightless feathers of swallow.

iii. The poet recalls his carefree days of childhood which was free from trouble. His spirit was then too light to be overwhelmed with the beautiful aspect of nature that he saw around him. The boundless ecstasy felt in his heart turned his spirit weightless like the feathers of the swallow. In such a state of losing himself so completely in nature, the poet felt as if his spirit flew like swallows in the vast stretch of the sky.

iv. The poet feels as if his spirit s now heavy since he fails to be lost in nature like his childhood days. The poet bemoans the loss of his boisterous childhood due to time’s onslaught. As he grows mature, he feels that the child within him is growing more exhausted. The spirit which was once so full of vitality is now heavy with the weight of adulthood. Hence, he laments over the loss of his rapturous spirit.

v. Summer is most welcoming in the European world. The poet being deeply plagued down by his physical ailment fails to enjoy the warm summer that he might have enjoyed during his childhood days. Hence, he feels deeply troubled realising that the warm summer after prolong winter has no effect upon him. In fact, nothing can soothe his aching adult heart which is deeply wounded by the blows of life.

Question 4.
Read the following verse paragraph and answer the questions that follow:
I remember, I remember,
The fir trees dark and high;
I used to think their slender tops
Were close against the sky:
It was a childish ignorance,
But now ‘tis little joy
To know I’m farther off from heaven
Than when I was a boy.

i. How does the poet describe the fir tree?
ii. Why does he remember the fir tree?
iii. What is considered as “childish ignorance”? Why?
iv. How does the poet feel realizing that he is farther off from heav’n?
v. What is the theme of the poem?
vi. Why does the poet look back at the past all throughout the poem?
Answer:
i. The penultimate stanza of the poem begins with the picture of a fir tree which the poet still remembers vividly. He says that the tree stood dark and high against the sky. Hood however was enamoured by the enormous height of the tree which evoked a feeling of heaven being close to the tree.

ii. The fir tree clearly demonstrates the way Hood saw the world as a child. With its “slender tops” the tree seemed to touch the heaven above. Such innocent belief actually goads the poet to remember the fir tree which haunts him with the thought of innocence being lost forever due to time’s onslaught. The poet thus, clings to the days of happy past which at least aids him escape the struggles and harsh realities of adulthood which hails horrors in his life.

iii. The thought of the enormous fir tree being close to heaven is nothing but a “childish ignorance”. The poet ultimately realises this after he is matured enough to understand that heaven is a faraway place where one cannot reach with a rational mind. Unconcerned and free from the facts of the world, children live a life far away from reality. The pure and innocent mind of children fancy things which are unacceptable in the adult world.

This is because of maturity and exposure to the harsh realities of life. The poet thus, bemoans that it was nothing but a “childish ignorance” to consider heaven being so near which hence thought when he was a child.

iv. The poet feels deeply sad realising the gulf between him and heaven. His innocent mind was once consoled with the thought that he was closer to God as a child. The gigantic fir tree however gave him such assurance. But, now with his maturity, the poet finally realises that he is far away from heaven. Such isolation from the realm of spirituality deeply grieves the poet, realising that life was once so simple and innocent which lost forever.

v. The entire poem is a vehement contrast between childhood happiness with adult despondence and distress. While looking back at the past, the poet feels depressed realizing that his carefree days are over. This realization grieves his heart and he thus, recalls the memory of his childhood all throughout the poem. In this sense the predominant theme of the poem is the loss of childhood which means the loss of innocence and freedom.

vi. The entire poem is a return to childhood era, suggested by the title, “I Remember, I Remember. The poet deliberately goes down memory lane to retrospect upon the happy days of childhood which consoles his troubled mind, exposed to the harsh realities of life. Life in those days was carefree indeed. The unrestrained freedom which he enjoyed during his childhood is now over.

The poet is now awfully trapped in the dicious world of adulthood which promises nothing but endless misfortune. Hence, the poet yearns for his childhood days which are but a symbolic retreat to a world of innocence, purity and simplicity.

I Remember, I Remember Poem Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs)

Question 1.
Which among these the speaker does not recall in the poem?
a. house
b. sun rays
c. moon light
d. lilacs
Answer:
c. moon light

Question 2.
What comes through the little window of his house……………
a. insects
b. moon light
c. sun rays
d. birds
Answer:
c. sun rays

Question 3.
What does the poet long for presently?
a. to go back to his childhood
b. to die
c. to have good time with his family
d. to sit in his garden and relax
Answer:
b. to die

Question 4.
The colour of the roses remembered by the poet are ……..
a. yellow and white
b. black and yellow
c. red and white
d. pink and black
Answer:
c. red and white

Question 5.
The nest of robin was built in …………
a. laburnum tree
b. willow tree
c. lilac tree
d. fir tree
Answer:
c. lilac tree

Question 6.
Which tree was planted by his brother?
a. fir tree
b. laburnum tree
c. willow tree
d. oak tree
Answer:
b. laburnum tree

Question 7.
On what occasion did his brother plant tree?
a. birthday
b. marriage anniversary
c. death anniversary
d. no specific occasion
Answer:
a. birthday

Question 8.
What is compared to a swallow?
a. the mood of the poet
b. childhood spirit
c. old age
d. adulthood
Answer:
b. childhood spirit

Question 9.
“My spirit flew in feathers then, That is so heavy now” ………….. What is so heavy now?
a. body weight of the poet
b. the poet’s spirit now
c. memory
d. the poet’s spirit in childhood
Answer:
(b) and (d)

Question 10.
What is meant by “fever on my brow”?
a. high body temperature
b. the physical ailment which has taken away the youthful vitality
c. sadness particulary due to loss of innocence
d. None of the above
Answer:
b. the physical ailment which has taken away the youthful vitality

Question 11.
What “childish ignorance” does the poet mention in the poem …………
a. the thought of the enormous fir tree being close to heaven
b. the thought of heaven being far away.
c. spirit can fly like swallow
d. The punctuality of sun, maintaining perfect equilibrium between day and night
Answer:
a. the thought of the enormous fir tree being close to heaven

I Remember, I Remember Poem Annotations with Comments

Stanza I:

I remember: The refrain continues throughout the poem. The word remember” sets the nostalgic mood of the speaker as he goes detail Into describing his childhood days.
Sun : refers to sun rays
Sun ………….. at morn : the rays of sun ushered in the morning though the small window of the house,
Wink : blink
Wink too soon : leaped up early
Brought too …. a day: the sun never prolonged the day by setting down late
Borne: carried or moved particular thing
borne my breath away: take my breath away, The poet longs to die amidst the darkness of the night

Comment:

I remember: An example of refrain. Refrain Is a repeated line or number of lines in a poem which is employed for the sake of emphasizing a particular idea. The poet here emphasizes upon the fact that how simple was his childhood days which is destroyed by time.

Sun: Sun here is personified as a force for good. He is presented as a true comrade of a child as he brightens up the days of childhood. Moreover, the sun Is also an example of a perfectionist. He leaps and sets down on time which helps to maintain a perfect equilibrium between day and night.

Night…. my breath away: Night here is the symbol of sufferings and misfortunes associated with adulthood. It is exactly the opposite of day which symbolises purity and innocence. The speaker longs go die amidst the darkness of the night so as to end his earthly misfortunes.

Stanza II:

Those flowers: refer to those flowers like red and white roses, violets, lilies and lilacs.
Robin built: refers to the nest of robin built in the lilac tree.
Set: planted
Laburnum: refers to the laburnum tree
His birthday: the birthday of his brother
Still alive: The laburnum tree which was once planted by his brother is yet alive.

Comments

Those flowers: Those flowers that the poet still remembers represent the harmonic era of his childhood. Hood Is now troubled with pains and sorrows. Hence, the only way to ease his mind Is to go down the memory lane and peep into the world which was so carefree and colourful,

The tree is living yet: There might be two possible meanings ‘of this expression. Firstly, it might suggest that the tree is still alive whereas the person who has planted it Is no more alive. Next, while the tree is living and growing, the poet is decaying.

Stanza III:

Swing: move to and fro.
air must rush as fresh: he used to swing with unimaginable rapidness to feel the rush of fresh air all around
swallows: a kind of bird
swallows on the wing: Hood relates his childhood to a bird, flying freely as he swings on his favourite tree. In other words, the bird’s freedom is compared to the freedom associated with the childhood days
heavy: grave
so heavy now: heavy with the misfortunes of life
summer pool: refers to the warm summer pond
fever: agitation sickness
brow: forehead
fever on my brow: the physical ailment which has taken away the youthful vitality of the poet

Comments:

My spirit flew in feathers then: The joy of childhood is the joy of freedom. The carefree life that the poet once enjoyed during his childhood days is now over. While he recalls those days he feels elated imagining his blithe spirit flying like a bird. The word “flew” also suggests that the period of childhood joviality has now ended and the only relief for the poet is to go down the memory lane and ease his troubled mind.

And summer pool …. fever on my brow: Since old age hails trouble in one’s life, a person often looses his ability to appreciate things around him.

The innocence of childhood can easily embrace the joy of watching beautiful flowers or even the joy of swinging in the trees and enjoy beautiful warm summer, long cherished in the European world. The poet being deeply plagued down by his physical ailment fails to enjoy the warm summer that he might have enjoyed during his childhood days. In this sense the entire stanza is a contrast between the youthful physical feelings of vitality and ease with heaviness of the presence.

Stanza IV:

high: the poet uses hyperbole to describe the enormous height of the tree. The tree however seems to touch the sky
slender: thin
close against the sky: the tree seemed to touch the sky.
childish ignorance: it was his childish ignorance to imagine the tree being close to heaven
‘tis little joy: little joy because his rational mind has realised that the tree never touched the heaven. In other words, his rational mind has permanently destroyed his faith in spirituality.

Comment:

But now ‘tis little joy: The simplicity of thought is lost forever. Life is now too complicated to consider being near heaven as it was once imagined by the poet during his childhood days. Hence, he bemoans that he is now left with little joy Imagining things which are irrational. The poet’s loss of faith on spirituality is well evident here.

I Remember, I Remember Poem Paraphrase

Stanza I:

The speaker distinctly remembers the house he was born. He feels glad to recall how the rays of sun ushered in the morning though the small window of the house. The sun however was too punctual. He neither leaped up early nor prolonged the day by setting down late. Because of the sun’s punctuality, the equilibrium between day and night was perfect in those days. But now, the speaker longs that the night takes away his breath. In other words the speaker longs for death amidst the darkness of the night.

Stanza II:

The scene now shifts to a garden where the speaker used to spend time looking at the colourful flowers all around. He remembers the red and white roses, the violets, lilies and lilacs grown in the garden. He considered those flowers as if blessed by heaven. Moreover, he also remembers the nest of robin, built in the lilac tree. The laburnum tree which was once planted by his brother on his birthday, is still alive.

Stanza III:

The retrospection of childhood memories continues as the poet recalls, how he used to swing with unimaginable rapidness to feel the rush of fresh air all around. He was like weightless feathers, flying in the air. But, now as he grows old his spirit is turned so heavy that he can longer engage in such boisterous activities of his childhood days. Moreover, the heaviness of his present life disallows him to appreciate the beautiful summer which he once enjoyed during his childhood days.

Stanza IV:

The poet now recalls the dark and enormous fir tree which seemed to touch the sky above. During his childhood days he imagined that the top of the fir tree was close to the heaven as it seemed to touch the sky. The poet now realises that it was just a childish innocence to imagine the tree being close to heaven. Such imagination is lost forever. The rational mind of the poet feels sad to realise that he is far away from heaven.

I Remember, I Remember Poem Summary by Thomas Hood

Hood’s “I Remember, I Remember” idolizes the rapturous childhood with all its simplicity which finally ends in sorrow with the growing up of an individual. The speaker in the poem is entrapped in nostalgic mood while he recalls his childhood days, destroyed by time. In the first stanza however, the speaker recalls the house he was born.

He feels glad to recollect how the rays of sun ushered in the morning through the small window of the house. The sun however was a too punctual. He neither leaped up early nor prolonged the day by setting down late. Because of the sun’s punctuality, the equilibrium between day and night was perfect in those days. But now, the speaker longs that the night takes away his breath. In other words the speaker longs for death amidst the darkness of the night.

The scene now shifts to a garden where the speaker used to spend time looking at the colourful flowers all around. He remembers the red and white roses, the violets, lilies and lilacs, grown in the garden. He considered those flowers as if blessed by heaven. Moreover, he also remembers the nest of robin, built in the lilac tree. The laburnum tree which was once planted by his brother on his (brother’s) birthday is still alive. The poet remembers how he used to swing with unimaginable rapidness to feel the rush of fresh air all around.

He was like weightless feathers, flying in the air. But, now as he grows old his spirit is turned so heavy that he can longer engage in such boisterous activities of his childhood days. Moreover, the heaviness of his present life disallows him to appreciate the beautiful summer which he once enjoyed during his childhood days.

The penultimate stanza recalls the dark enormous fir tree which seemed to touch the sky above. During his childhood days, the poet imagined that the top of the fir tree was close-to the heaven as it seemed to touch the sky. Such simplicity of thought is now lost forever. The rational mind of the poet finally enlightens him with the thought of heaven being too far away from him. This however grieves the poet as he misses the innocence and closeness he had with god in his young age.

I Remember, I Remember Poem Introduction

“I Remember, I Remember” was written by Hood in 1844 a year before his death in 1845. The poem was later included in The Poetical Works of Thomas Hood (1903), ‘collected by one of the founding members of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, William Michael Rossetti.

The poem idolizes the rapturous childhood with all its simplicity which finally ends in sorrow with the growing up of an individual. The speaker in the poem is entrapped in nostalgic mood while he recalls his childhood days, destroyed by time. In this sense, “I Remember, I Remember” may be regarded as a typical romantic poem since the poet bemoans the loss of his childhood, failing to retreat back.

Treasure Chest A Collection of ICSE Poems Workbook Answers

Treasure Chest Workbook Answers Poem 2 Skimbleshanks: The Railway Cat

Treasure Chest Workbook Answers Poem 2 Skimbleshanks The Railway Cat

Treasure Chest Workbook Answers Poem 2 Skimbleshanks: The Railway Cat

Skimbleshanks: The Railway Cat Poem Comprehension Questions Answers

Question 1.
Read the following verse paragraph and answer the questions that follow:
We must find him or the train can’t start.”
All the guards and all the porters
and the stationmaster’s daughters
They are searching high and low,
Saying “Skimble where is Skimble
for unless he’s very nimble
Then the Night Mail just can’t go.”

i. Who is Skimbleshanks? What do you know about him?
ii. Why people are waiting for Skimbleshanks?
iii. Why the train cannot start without Skimbleshanks?
iv. Where is Skimbleshanks ultimately found?
v. What does “hunt the thimble” suggest in the poem?
Answer:
i. Skimbleshanks is a diligent railway cat who ensures that everything goes well with the passengers of the Night Mail. In fact, he is very particular about the hospitality of the passengers and thus, always at pain to make them feel that they are well taken care of. Skimbleshanks however is very cold.

Passengers are afraid of him. While he is on the move, people hardly dare to fool around. A well organized journey is however ensured by Skimbleshanks at the cost of passenger’s freedom.

ii. Since Skimbleshanks is responsible for the supervision of the Night Mail, the train cannot leave without him. People are thus eagerly waiting for Skimbleshanks, failing to find him anywhere.

iii. Since Skimbleshanks is responsible for the supervision of the Night Mail, the train cannot leave without him. The Night Mail however is ready to start off. It is almost 11:39 P.M. Yet the train cannot leave the platform since Skimbleshanks is found nowhere.

iv. After a hectic search for Skimbleshanks, the railway cat finally leaps us from behind the luggage van and relives the tension of all. Skimbleshanks was “busy in the luggage van”. Hence, he was late.

v. Hunt the thimble is famous party game in which one person hides a thimble, or other small object, somewhere in the room, while all other players wait outside. Failing to find Skimbleshanks, people thought that he must have been engaged playing such game with his mates.

Question 2.
Read the following verse paragraph and answer the questions that follow:
He gives one flash of his glass-green eyes
And the signal goes “All Clear!”
And we’re off at last for the northern part
Of the Northern Hemisphere!
You may say that by and large
it is Skimble who’s in charge
Of the Sleeping Car Express.

i. Where is Skimbleshanks? How does he signals the Night Mail to start off its journey?
ii. Where is the Night Mail heading towards?
iii. Who is in Charge of the Night Mail? Whom does he supervise?
iv. Do you think that Skimbleshanks is fit for his job? Give reason for your answer.
Answer:
i. Skimbleshanks is finally into the Night Mail which leaves after an intolerable delay. With a flash of his green eyes, Skimbleshanks gives the signal to the Night Mail to start off its journey.

ii. The speaker who is a passenger himself says that they are heading towards the northern part of the Northern Hemisphere. This vague destination suggests no specific destination.

iii. Skimbleshanks is in charge of the Night Mail. Skimbleshanks is in charge of supervising all including the driver, the guards as well as the bagmen who are playing cards.

iv. Skimbleshanks is highly suitable for his job of a supervisor. He is energetic, serious, and works with full dedication. Always he is at pain to ensures a pleasant journey with faultless hospitality to the passengers. He looks at everything and maintains discipline. Even at night, he remains awake to ensure safety to the passengers. Skimbleshanks is thus, aptly suitable for his job of a supervisor.

Question 3.
Read the following verste paragraph and answer the questions that follow:
Down the corridor he paces
and examine all the faces
Of the travellers in the First and the Third;
He establishes control by a regular patrol
And he’d know at once if anything occurred.
He will watch you without winking and he sees what you are thinking
And it’s certain that he doesn’t approve
Of hilarity and riot, so the folk are very quiet
When Skimble is about and on the move.

i. What does Skimbleshanks do while he paces through the corridor?
ii. How does Skimbleshanks establish control over the passengers?
iii. What are the things that Skimbleshanks disallows the passenger to do?
iv. Why one cannot play prank with Skimbleshanks?
v. Why Skimbleshanks’ presence -cannot be ignored?
vi. How does Eliot present Skimbleshanks in the poem?
Answer:
i. While he paces through the corridor, Skimbleshanks keeps an eye on everything around to ensure that nothing goes wrong. For example, he would scrutinize the face of every passenger, try reading people’s thought and ensure that they maintain peace and silence when Skimbleshanks is on the move. Skimbleshanks however is frequently on move right from first to third class compartment and exercise his control over all.

ii. Skimbleshanks deliberately exercises control over all the passengers. While on move, he continues staring at the face of the passengers, try reading their thoughts and ensure that they maintain silence all throughout their journey. Particularly when Skimbleshanks is on move, passengers feel scared to fool around or create nuisances as they are afraid of the cat. In a way, Skimbleshanks exercises strict control over the passengers and completely destroys their freedom.

iii. In order to maintain discipline, Skimbleshanks exercises strict control over the passengers. Skimbleshanks however does not approve of any kind of amusement. Passengers are strictly disallowed to create nuisances. Moreover, when Skimbleshanks is “on the move”, none can play pranks with him or ignore him. In a way, Skimbleshanks deliberately oppresses the passengers so that “nothing goes wrong on the Northern Mail”.

iv. Skimbleshanks’ magnetic personality simply scares the passengers. They thus, feel afraid to play prank with him which might offend the serious cat.

v. Skimbleshanks is possessed with magnetic personality. He is serious, cold and commanding. Hence, his presence cannot be ignored. Passengers are always alert whenever Skimbleshanks is “on the move”.

vi. Considering the socio political situations in Europe at the time when Eliot wrote this poem, one might view Skimbleshanks in the light of a dictator. Skimbleshanks activities inside the compartment suggest his love to oppress freedom. Like a dictator, he controls everything by “a regular patrol”.

People are scared of him as Skimbleshanks “doesn’t approve / Of hilarity and riot”. Their thoughts are continuously monitored and they hardly have courage to play prank with the Skimbleshanks whenever he is on move. All these suggest the oppressive nature of Skimbleshanks which Eliot explores with enough hilarity.

Question 4.
Read the following verse paragraph and answer the questions that follow:
Oh, it’s very pleasant when
you have found your little den
With your name written up on the door.
And the berth is very neat
with a newly folded sheet
And there’s not a speck of dust on the floor.
There is every sort of light- you can make it dark or bright;
There’s a handle that you turn to make a breeze.
There’s a funny little basin
you’re supposed to wash your face in
And a crank to shut the window if you sneeze.

i. What is “little den” referred to in the given excerpt? Why does one feel pleasant finding one’s den?
ii. In what sense the railway berth is considered neat and clean?
iii. Describe in brief the facilities available in the “little den”.
iv. In what way are the windows helpful to the passengers?
v. What task is assigned to the guard by Skimbleshanks?
Answer:
i. The little den referred to in the given excerpt is the railway compartment coach meant for the passengers to board in. Passengers however feel nice to see their names written on the door of compartments coach so that they can easily find their berth.

ii. Skimbleshanks ensrues a neat and clean berth for the passengers. For example, there is no speck of dust on the floor of the compartment. Even passengers are sanctioned new bed sheet, folded on the berth. A spick and span compartment thus, delights the passengers.

iii. A cosy compartment is offered to the passengers of the night mail so that they enjoy a pleasant journey. The cabins are clean with no speck of dust on the floor. There are new bed sheets, folded on the berth and adjustable light overhead. The window facilitates air inside with handle, easy to operate. Even one can shut the windows if one sneezes and feels cold. Moreover, a little basin is provided to wash face.

iv. The window helps for a smooth air flow inside the compartment. The well fitted handle also facilitate passengers to shut the window in case they feel cold and sneeze continuously.

v. While the guard is on move, Skimbleshanks remind him to ask the passengers whether the morning tea was served hot. The guard obeys the command diligently.

Question 5.
Read the following verse paragraph and answer the questions that follow?
“Do you like your morning tea weak or strong?”
But Skimble’s just behind him and was ready to remind him,
For Skimble won’t let anything go wrong.
And when you creep into your cosy berth
And pull up the counterpane,
You ought to reflect that it’s very nice
To know that you won’t be bothered by mice —
You can leave all that to the Railway Cat,
The Cat of the Railway Train!

i. Who enquires about the morning tea? Why does the person enquire about the morning tea?
ii. Why does one feel nice when he creep into his berth?
iii. Why one will not be bothered by mice?
iv. What assurance is felt by the passengers when Skimbleshanks is there?
Answer:
i. On Skimbleshanks’ order, the railway guard asks every passenger of the Night Mail whether the morning tea was served hot. The guard however diligently follows the command of the railway cat.

ii. One feels nice when one creep into his berth due all because of the incredible hospitality ensured by Skimbleshanks. Passengers feel very comfortable when they pull up the quilt cover and get inside for a cosy sleep. Such type of comfort makes a journey worth memorable.

iii. Skimbleshanks the railway cat is always at pain to ensure a comfortable journey to the passengers. Hence, when he is there in charge of hospitality passengers are assured that there will be no trouble of mice in the compartment. One can enjoy a comfortable sleep all throughout the night.

iv. When Skimbleshanks is there to take care of the passengers, there is no worry for the passengers. They can safely rely upon the railway cat all because of his incredible efficiency. In other words, passengers feel secured when Skimbleshanks is responsible for their well being.

Question 6.
Read the following verse paragraph and answer the questions that follow:
In the watches of the night he is always fresh and bright;
Every now and then he has a cup of tea
With perhaps a drop of Scotch while he’s keeping on the watch,
Only stopping here and there to catch a flea.
You were fast asleep at Crewe and so you never knew
That he was walking up and down the station;
You were sleeping all the while he was busy at Carlisle,
Where he greets the stationmaster with elation.

i. How does Skimbleshanks keep himself fresh and bright at night?
ii. Why does he stop here and there inside the compartment?
iii. What does Skimbleshanks do in Carlisle and Dumfries?
iv. Where ultimately do the passengers get down? Why there is no need to wait for the passengers to get down?
v. How does Skimbleshanks adieu the passengers?
Answer:
i. Skimbleshanks does not sleep at night. He keeps himself fresh and bright at night by taking cups of tea or a drop of Scotch. Such beverages simply help him to stay awake at night and remain fresh.

ii. Skimbleshanks is seen stopping here and there inside the compartment all throughout the night. This is because of catching flees and help the passengers to enjoy uninterrupted sleep.

iii. Skimbleshanks remains awake all throughout the night. When all the passengers are fast asleep, Skimbleshanks is found greeting the Stationmaster with joy at Carlisle. Moreover, he is found speaking to police at Dumfries.

iv. Passengers ultimately get down at Gallowgate, a neighbourhood of the city of Glasgow, Scotland. Skimbleshanks’ hospitality is so perfect that passengers do not have to wait to get down at the station. The railway cat however would help them to get down on the platform.

v. Skimbleshanks ensures that he adieus all the passengers while they get down at Gallowgate. He used to continue weaving his long assuring that he will meet the passengers again on the Midnight Mail.

Skimbleshanks: The Railway Cat Poem Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs)

Question 1.
Who is Skimbleshanks?
a. dog
b. cat
c. horse
d. detective
Answer:
b. cat

Question 2.
The Night Mail is ready to depart at …………..
a. 11.39 PM
b. 10 AM
c. 12AM
d. 8 PM
Answer:
a. 11.39 PM

Question 3.
Skimbleshanks is finally found …………….
a. in the garden
b. behind the luggage van
c. inside the compartment of Night Mail
d. at station master’s room
Answer:
b. behind the luggage van

Question 4.
How does Skimbleshanks give signal to the night mail?
a. weaving his tail
b. mewing
c. With a flash of his green eyes
d. by getting into the train
Answer:
c. With a flash of his green eyes

Question 5.
What is the duty of Skimbleshanks in the Night Mail?
a. cook
b. supervisor
c. sweeper
d. laundryman
Answer:
b. supervisor

Question 6.
What does Skimbleshanks do while he is on move?
a. talk to the passengers
b. scrutinizing the face of every passenger
c. ignore the passengers
d. misbehaving with the passengers
Answer:
b. scrutinizing the face of every passenger

Question 7.
What cannot be done with Skimbleshanks?
a. talking to him
b. asking him questions
c. relying upon him
d. playing pranks with him
Answer:
d. playing pranks with him

Question 8.
Eliot presents Skimbleshanks in the light of a …………….
a. philanthropist
b. misanthropist
c. dictator
d. misogynist
Answer:
c. dictator

Question 9.
Where does a passenger find his/her name?
a. on the berth
b. in the platform chart
c. on the door of compartments
d. near the basin
Answer:
c. on the door of compartments

Question 10.
How does Skimbleshanks keep himself awake at night?
a. by talking to the passengers
b. watching movies
c. drinking cups of tea or scotch
d. reading books
Answer:
c. drinking cups of tea or scotch

Question 11.
What does Skimbleshanks order the guard to do?
a. to moniter the activities of the passengers
b. to play prank with them
c. to encourge them to read newspaper
d. to ask the passengers whether the morning tea was served hot.
Answer:
(a) and (b)

Question 12.
How does Skimbleshanks adieus the passengers?
a. bidding goodbye
b. smiling
c. offering them chocolate
d. weaving his long brown tail
Answer:
d. weaving his long brown tail

Question 13.
What is the final destination of the Night Mail?
a. Gallowgate
b. Dumfries
c. Crewe
d. Carlisle
Answer:
a. Gallowgate

Skimbleshanks: The Railway Cat Poem Annotations with Comments

There’s a whisper….luggage vin!:

Whisper: murmur
Line: railway platform
Thimble: a small metal or plastic cap with a closed end.
Hunt….thimble: hunt the thimble is a party game in which one person, ides a thimble, or other small object, somewhere in the room, while all other players wait outside.
train can’t start: train can’t start since Skimbleshanks is in charge of the train.
porter: a person employed to carry luggage and other loads, especially in a railway station
high and low: Everywhere
nimble: quick
frantic: worried, anxious
saunter: walk
Skimble will appear: Skimble shanks will appear from behind the luggage van
rear: endmost

He gives one flash ……………… more or less:

FIash: to send forth light with a sudden, transient brilliancy northern part …………………
Hemisphere: refers to Scotland
by and large: on the whole
who’s in charge: Skimbleshanks is entrusted with the job of supervising the passengers in the train.
more or less: roughly

Down the corridor ……………… Skimbleshanks is aboard:

pace: walk up and down
First and the Third: first and third class compartment
patrol: monitoring
winking: blinking
hilarity: fun
riot: disturbance
Pranks: jokes

Comment:

he doesn’t approve ………….. on the move : These lines establish the Eliot’s aim to present Skimbleshanks in the light of a dictator. Though law and order is maintained by Skimbleshanks’ strict control over everything, but the freedom of the passengers is completely destroyed.

Skimbleshanks “doesn’t approve / Of hilarity and riot” which are so common among the passengers. Moreover, when Skimbleshanks is “on the move”, nonè can play pranks with him. In a way, Skimbleshanks cannot be ignored. Like a dictator, he also craves for attention.

Oh, it’s very pleasant ………. Cat of the Railway Train!:

Den: small cabin
Berth: seat
Sheet: bed cover
Speck: dot
dark or bright: one can regulate the light over the berth according to the need
crank: handle
Brightly: energetically
Creep: move slowly and carefully
Counterpane: quilt or cover
Reflect: acknowledge

Comment:

Skimbleshanks ensures a pleasant journey with faultless hospitality to the passengers. The clean compartment, with spotless bed sheet on each berth, the little basin to wash face, the light overhead all establish a perfect picture of a train compartment always under Skimbleshanks’ strict surveillance. But, the comfort ensured to the passengers is at the cost of their freedom.

They are only allowed to enjoy the journey quietly as the serious cat “doesn’t approve / Of hilarity and riot” when he is on the move. Skimbleshanks activities inside the compartment suggests his love to oppressing freedom. For example, he “will watch you without winking” and “he sees what you are thinking”. Hence, “nothing goes wrong on the Northern Mail / When Skimbleshanks is aboard.”

In the watches ………… Railway Train:

Flea: blood sucking insect
Crewe: a town in NW England
Carlisle: Carlisle is a cathedral city and civil parish in Cumbria, England
Elation: joy
Dumfries: Dumfries is the largest burgh in southwestern Scotland.
Gallowgate: a neighbourhood of the city of Glasgow, Scotland.

Skimbleshanks: The Railway Cat Poem Paraphrase

There’s a whisper….luggage van!:

Skimbleshanks the railway cat is found nowhere when the Night Mail is ready to start off. Its’ almost 11:39 P.M, people are waiting for the cat, calling his name aloud. Where must have Skimble been?wonders the railway staffs like guards, porters and even the stationmaster’s daughters. They continue searching everywhere as the signal is due and the passengers have grown impatient. Finally, Skimbleshanks leaps up from behind the luggage van and relives the tension of all.

He gives one flash …………… more or less:

With a flash of his green eyes, Skimbleshanks gives the signal. The train finally moved out of the station, and heads towards Scotland. Skimbleshanks is in charge of the train. He will supervise all including the driver, the guards as well as the bagmen who are playing cards.

Down the corridor ………… Skimbleshanks is aboard:

Skimbleshanks begins his work scrutinizing the face of every passenger. He would ensure a frequent patrol from first to third class compartment and exercise his control over all. For example, he would continue staring at the face of the passengers without even blinking his eyes.

He would try reading people’s thought and ensure that they maintain silence when Skimbleshanks is on the move. Passengers hardly dare to fool around in his presence which cannot be ignored. Hence, nothing goes wrong in the Northern Mail when Skimbleshanks is aboard.

Oh, it’s very pleasant ……………… Cat of the Railway Train!:

It looks nice to see everything in order names of passengers written on the door of compartments, clean cabin floor with new bed sheet, folded on the berth and adjustable light overhead. The window facilitates air inside with handle, easy to operate. Even one can shut the windows if one sneezes and feels cold. The guard shows up with a polite gesture with Skimbleshanks behind.

He enquires whether the morning tea was served hot when Skimbleshanks is about to remind him about it. Skimbleshanks will not allow any trouble to the passengers who feel relaxed knowing that there are no mice around to spoil their sleep. Skimbleshanks can safely be relied upon for his unbelievable efficiency.

In the watches Railway Train:

Skimbleshanks doesn’t sleep at night. Cups of tea or a drop of Scotch keeps him awake all the night. He is often found catching fleas, while passengers are fast asleep. When the Night Mail reaches Crewe, he is found walking up and down the station.

At Carlisle he is found greeting the Stationmaster and speaking with police at Dumfries. Finally when the train reaches Gallowgate, Skimbleshanks would help the passengers to get down on the platform. Even he adieus all weaving his long brown tail which seems to assure that he will meet again on the Midnight Mail.

Skimbleshanks: The Railway Cat Poem Summary by T.S. Eliot

Skimbleshanks the railway cat is found nowhere when the Night Mail is ready to start off. Its almost 11:39 P.M, people are waiting for the Skimbleshanks. Where must have Skimble been? wonders the railway staffs like guards, porters and even the stationmaster’s daughters. They continue searching everywhere as the signal is due and the passengers have grown impatient.

Finally, Skimbleshanks leaps up from behind the luggage van and relives the tension of all. With a flash of his green eyes, Skimbleshanks gives the signal. The train finally moves out of the station, and heads towards Scotland. Skimbleshanks is in charge of the train.

He will supervise all including the driver, the guards as well as the bagmen who are playing cards. At first, he observes the face of every passenger while in his patrol from first to third class compartment. Silence is ensured when he is on the move. Passengers hardly dare to fool around in his presence. Hence, nothing goes wrong in the Northern Mail when Skimbleshanks is aboard.

However, it looks nice to see everything in order names of passengers written on the door of compartments, clean cabin floor with new bed sheet, folded on the berth and adjustable light overhead. Skimbleshanks ensures every comfort of the passengers in the Night Mail which also includes smooth passage of air inside through the window, easy to operate with its well fitted handle.

In case one feels cold and sneezes, one can shut the windows easily. Skimbleshanks also sees that the guard asks all the passengers whether the morning tea was served hot. In fact, the diligent cat will not allow any trouble to the passengers who feel relaxed knowing that there are no mice around to spoil their sleep.

At night Skimbleshanks remains awake. Cups of tea or a drop of Scotch keeps him awake all the night. When the Night Mail reaches Crewe, he is found walking up and down the station. At Carlisle he is found greeting the Stationmaster and speaking with police at Dumfries. Finally when the train reaches Gallowgate, Skimbleshanks would help the passengers to get down on the platform. Even he adieus all, weaving his long brown tail which seems to assure that he will meet again on the Midnight Mail.

Skimbleshanks: The Railway Cat Poem Introduction

Written in 1939, Skimbleshanks: The Railway Cat is a part of Eliot’s Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats. The poem though appears simple at a glance with the presentation of a diligent cat, but there are more than the surface meaning to it.

Skimbleshanks however represents a dictator who keeps an eye around him and controls everything. In this sense the passengers of the train are under surveillance of an efficient dictator as Skimbleshanks “will watch everywhere in the train” and see “what you are thinking.”

Treasure Chest A Collection of ICSE Poems Workbook Answers

Treasure Chest Workbook Answers Poem 1 A Work of Artifice

Treasure Chest Workbook Answers Poem 1 A Work of Artifice

Treasure Chest Workbook Answers Poem 1 A Work of Artifice

A Work of Artifice Poem Comprehension Questions Answers

Question 1.
Read the following verse paragraph and answer the questions that follow:
The bonsai tree
in the attractive pot
could have grown eighty feet tall
on the side of a mountain
till split by lightning.
But a gardener
carefully prune it.

i. What is a bonsai tree? Explain the metaphor associated with the bonsai tree.
ii. Where is the bonsai tree grown?
iii. Why does the poet say that the bonsai tree could have grown eighty feet tall?
iv. Where could have the bonsai tree grown? Why it is denied to grow there?
v. What does the word lightening suggest in this context?
vi. Explain the metaphor associated with the gardener. What does the word prune suggest in this context?
Answer:
i. Bonsai is the art of growing artificially dwarfed varieties of trees and shrubs in pots. Bonsai, however Is a globally popular Japanese gardening technique which involves miniaturizing trees so that they can be grown in a pot. The bonsai tree is an extended metaphor that runs throughout the poem.

The tree however represents a woman oppressed in the patriarchal world. Like a bonsai tree which is grown in the limited space of a pot, women too are forced to live under limited space and opportunity so that they can be easily domesticated and dominated.

ii. The bonsai tree is deliberately grown in a decorative pot so that it remains as a piece of art, delightful to look at.

iii. The poet regrets that the bonsai tree is denied of growing to the height of eighty feet like all other big tree, grown on the side of a mountain. The natural right of the tree is denied only for the sake of beautifying the indoor.

Similar is the case for the women who like a bonsai tree are deprived of their fundamental rights and are forced to live within a limited space with limited opportunity. This however ails the poet who thus, bemoans that a tree which could have “grown eighty feet tall” is deliberately restricted to “nine inches”.

iv. The bonsai tree could have grown on the side of a mountain by being exposed to nature with all its lethal effects like lightening. But unfortunately it is denied of its natural surrounding and forced to grow up in a pot. This is all because of the gardener’s deliberate attempt to dwarf the tree for the sake of beautifying the indoor.

v. Lightening here refers to the natural calamity which often harms a tree exposed to nature. But, there is more to the surface meaning of it. The poet might be indicating the fact that the tree is consoled with the assurance of its safety from the inimical world outside when placed in a pot. This exactly the way women are made to believe that they are weak and fragile and they must remain indoor. The aim however is to shatter their chance to grow up.

vi. Like the bonsai tree, the gardener too is an extended metaphor that runs throughout the poem. The gardener however is a significant representative of the patriarchal world who knows the way to oppress a woman. Hence, he dwarfs an eight feet tree to nine inches and justifies his action saying that it is the ‘nature” of the tree ‘in to be small and cozy, domestic and weak”.

Question 2.
Read the following verse paragraph and answer the questions that follow:
It is nine inches high.
Every day as he
whittles back the branches
the gardener croons,
It is your nature
to be small and cozy,
domestic and weak;
how lucky, little tree,
to have a pot to grow in.

i. What is nine inches high? Why?
ii. What does the gardener do the branches of the bonsai tree every day?
iii. What does the gardener croon to the tree?
iv. Why does the gardener croon to the bonsai tree every day?
v. Why is the bonsai tree considered lucky?
Answer:
i. The bonsai tree which the gardener grows in the pot is nine inches high. The gardener deliberately restricts its height to nine inches. This is because of his attempt to dwarf the tree so as to make it look beautiful.

ii. Every day the gardener trims the branches of the bonsai tree so that it remains small forever. This is however a deliberate attempt to deny the natural growth of the tree so that it remains beautiful to look at.

iii. Every day the gardener routinely sings to the bonsai tree reminding it about its nature to remain perennially small. The gardener also says that the bonsai tree is weak and fragile hence it is essential for the tree to remain indoor and be confined in a pot.

iv. The regular crooning of the gardener is not without a cause. It is a systematic attempt to brainwash the tree and make it believe that the bonsai tree is born weak and its nature is to remain small forever. The word “small” actually refers to its inherent inability to grow unrestrained amidst its natural surroundings.

The gardener simply deceives the tree with such false notion Just to establish his authority. This is meaningful in the sense that in the world of patriarchy, women too are deceived with such Ideas which destroys their confidence and their ability to grow up. The bonsai tree however is the symbol of an oppressed woman and the gardener on the other hand is the representative of the strict patriarchal society which limits the growth of a woman.

v. The bonsai tree is made to believe that it is weak and its nature is to remain small forever. Hence, the gardener says that the tree is fortunate to be safe in the pot where it grows with the constant care of the gardener.

Question 3.
Read the following verse paragraph and answer the questions that follow:
With living creatures
one must begin very early
to dwarf their growth:
the bound reet,
the crippled brain,
the hair in curlers,
the hands you
love to touch

i. What should begin at the early stage?
ii. What does the poet mean by “dwarf their growth”?
iii. What is meant by bound feet?
iv. Whose brained should be crippled? Why?
v. What hands does the poet refer to in this excerpt? How should the hands be taken care of?
vi. Describe in your own words the process of restricting the growth explored in this excerpt?
Answer:
i. The process of restricting one’s growth should begin at early stage. The poet actually hints about the ways women are restricted from growing up both mentally, and physically. The aim is to domesticate them so that men can have permanent control over them.

ii. The expression ‘dwarf their growth” means to limit the opportunity. Like the bonsai tree which is deliberately dwarfed for beautifying indoors, women too are controlled from growing up both mentally and physically so that men have permanent control over them.

iii. The poet here refers to the pre-20th century Chinese beauty practice of binding the feet of women from childhood so that their feet remain tiny and beautiful.

iv. The brain of women should be disabled to disallow their free thought and enlightenment. This however will facilitate men to have permanent control over them. Women should remain obsessed nurturing their beauty. They will remain as beautiful objects like the bonsai tree, delightful to look at. Here lies the success of the patriarchal society which always tends to cripp’e the brain of women.

A Work of Artifice Poem Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs)

Question 1.
Where is the bonsai tree grown?
a. on the side of mountain
b. pot
c. garden
d. near the lake
Answer:
b. pot

Question 2.
The bonsai tree could have grown to ……….
a. nine feet
b. nine inches
c. eight feet
d. four feet
Answer:
c. eight feet

Question 3.
What is the height of the bonsai tree?
a. eight feet
b. nine inches
c. four feet
d. nine feet
Answer:
b. nine inches

Question 4.
What does the gardener do to the tree everyday?
a. he trims the branches of the tree
b. he waters the tree
c. he brings the tree to the open space
d. he cuddles the tree out of love
Answer:
a. he trims the branches of the tree

Question 5.
The gardener is the symbol of ………..
a. philanthropy
b. an oppressor
c. an artist
d. a beautician
Answer:
b. an oppressor

Question 6.
The bonsai tree is the symbol of ……….
a. liberty
b. an oppressed woman
c. successful woman
d. enlightened woman
Answer:
b. an oppressed woman

Question 7.
The gardener says that it is the nature of the tree to be ……….
a. big
b. green
c. small and cosy
d. beautiful
Answer:
c. small and cosy

Question 8.
Why is bonsai tree considered lucky?
a. because it is small in size
b. because it looks beautiful
c. because the gardener loves it
d. because it is grown in pot with care and support as it is week in nature
Answer:
d. because it is grown in pot with care and support as it is week in nature

Question 9.
What must begin at very early stage?
a. the training of growing up with sound body and mind
b. the process of limiting one’s growth
c. the training of facing the world outside
d. none of the above
Answer:
b. the process of limiting one’s growth

Question 10.
Whose growth does the poet actually mean to be dwarfed?
a. the gardener
b. the world of patriarchy
c. women
d. all living creature
Answer:
c. women

Question 11.
A girl’s feet are bound because …………….
a. the feet will remain tiny and beautiful
b. the feet can grow unrestrained
c. they will not be able to walk and remain home forever
d. the they will experience pain which the patriarchal world wants to inflict upon them
Answer:
a. the feet will remain tiny and beautiful

Question 12.
What should be done to a woman’s brain?
a. brain should be crippled to stop women from being matured
b. brain should be stuffed with knowledge
c. brain must be nurtured properly so that a woman can grow up being dignified
d. Nothing should be dome to the brain.
Answer:
a. brain should be crippled to stop women from being matured

Question 13.
Hands of women are expected to be …………….
a. coarse
b. big in size
c. tender
d. nothing specified
Answer:
c. tender

A Work of Artifice Poem Annotations with Comments

Lines 1 to 7:

bonsai: the art of growing artificially dwarfed varieties of trees and shrubs in pots. Bonsai, however is a globally popular Japanese gardening technique which involves miniaturizing trees so that they can be grown in a pot.
Attractive : decorative
could have grown: this however suggests that the tree is denied of its natural growth and is deliberately dwarfed for the purpose of indoor decoration on the side….
mountain : even the tree is denied to grow in its natural surrounding
gardener : a person who tends and cultivates a garden
prune: to cut off or cut back parts of for better shape or more fruitful growth.

Comments:

Bonsai tree : The bonsai tree is the symbol of oppressed women, forced to live under strict patriarchal norms. Like the tree, women too are denied of freedom. They are domesticated and are encouraged to nurture their beauty and remain attractive like the “small” bonsai tree.

could have grown eighty feet tall: The word “could” actually hint about the possibility of women to grow unrestrained. But, like the bonsai tree they too are denied of their growth. In this sense the poem is a strong protest against gender inequality.

Gardener : He is a representative of the strict patriarchal society which limits the growth of a woman. The gardener however trims the branches of the poor tree and disallows its complete growth. This is indicative of the way women are forced to lead limited lives. Their dreams are shattered by being caged indoor and they are made to believe that they are inferior objects meant only for decoration.

Lines 8 to 16:

nine inches high: the height of the bonsai tree is deliberately restricted to nine inches.
Whittles: shapes, trim.
Whittles back the
branches: trim the branches to beautify the tree
Croons: hum or sing in a soft, low voice,
Small: small In size.
Cozy: comfortable
Domestic: tamed
Weak: feeble
Lucky: Lucky because the tree is delicately grown In pot with constant care and support. Moreover, it Is protected from the natural extremities by being kept indoor.
Pot: the pot suggests the limited space where the tree is grown to restrict its natural growth

Comment

gardener croons: Crooning however suggests the joy of the gardener while brainwashing the tree. The tree however is made to believe that it is weak and the best option is to confine the tree in a pot with enough care and support, Instead of allowing it to grow unre-strained amidst its natural surroundings. The deceptive nature of the gardener is evident here.

Lines 17 to 24:

Early: refers to childhood
Dwarf: limit
Dwarf their growth: limit their growth so that they remain indoor and beautify themselves
Bound feet: refers to the pre-20th century Chinese beauty practice of binding the feet of women from childhood, so that the feet remain tiny and beautiful.
crippled brain: Not only is the woman’s body subject to transformation, but her mind too is disabled, brainwashed and maimed by the patriarchal society
curler: a device for putting a curl into hair.
the hair in curlers: echoes an image of youth. Women are also brainwashed to retain their childhood innocence where
hands you …… Love to touch: appearance plays an important role. A sweet appearance will definitely make a woman attractive in male eyes. hands are expected to remain delicate. A woman with tender hands is considered pure and perfect.

A Work of Artifice Poem Paraphrase

Lines 1 to 7:

The bonsai tree which is presently placed in a beautiful pot is denied of its natural growth. It could have grown to the height of eighty feet, on the side of a mountain. It might have grown strong by being exposed to nature with all its lethal effects like lightening. But, a gardener carefully trimmed it and denied its natural growth amidst natural ambience.

Lines 8 to 16:

The bonsai tree is now only nine inches high. Everyday the gardener trims the branches of the poor tree and drones with pleasure, while reminding the tree of its nature to remain perennially small. The gardener assures the tree saying that it is fortunate to-be safe in the pot where it grows with the constant care of the gardener. The tree however is weak and fragile. The best option is to confine the tree in a pot with care and support, instead of allowing it to grow unrestrained. amidst its natural surroundings.

Lines 17 to 24:

It must be remembered that the early ‘stage of life is the best time to limit one’s growth. This however helps to ensure a perfect beauty of an’ object, trimmed carefully. For example, it is a well known’ practice of binding the feet of women from childhood, so that the feet remain tiny and beautiful.

Women however are also brainwashed to retain their childhood innocence and remain playful and attractive. Their hands are expected to remain delicate which adds richness to their beauty. It must be remembered that a woman with tender hands is a pure and perfect woman.

A Work of Artifice Poem Summary by Marge Piercy

The bonsai tree, placed in a beautiful pot is denied of its natural growth by the gardener. The tree could have grown to the height of eighty feet, on the side of a mountain. It might have grown strong by being exposed to nature with all its lethal effects like lightening. But, a gardener carefully trims the tree and denies its natural growth amidst natural ambience.

Thus the bonsai tree is now only nine inches high. Every day the gardener trims the branches of the poor tree and drones with pleasure, while reminding the tree of its nature to remain perennially small. The gardener assures; the tree saying that is fortunate to be safe in the pot where it grows with the constant care. The tree however is weak and fragile.

The best option is to confine the tree in a pot with care and support, instead of allowing it to grow unrestrained amidst its natural surroundings. It must be remembered that the early stage of life is, the best time to limit one’s growth. This however ensures a pepper shape of a body with innocent mind.

For example, the poet refers to the pre-20th century Chinese beauty practice of binding the feet of women 4 from childhood, so that their feet remain tiny and beautiful. A woman’s early life is the best time to brainwash her mind so that she remains forever obsessed nurturing her beauty.

Retaining her innocence will add richness to her beauty for which a woman should be taught to remain playful and attractive. Moreover, her hands are expected to remain delicate as a woman with tender hands is considered a pure and perfect. Thus, the bonsai tree in the poem is the symbol of an oppressed woman, systematically controlled.

The gardener on the other is a significant representative of the patriarchal world who knows the way to oppress a woman. Hence, he dwarfs an eight feet tree to nine inches and justifies his action saying that it is the “nature” of the tree “to be small and cozy, domestic and weak”. In this sense, the poem is about gender inequality prevalent in a male dominated world.

A Work of Artifice Poem Introduction

Written in 1970, A Work of Artifice by Marge Piercy was published in her 1999 collection, The Art of Blessing the Day: Poems with a Jewish Theme. The poem explores how women are forced to succumb to the norms and dictates of a patriarchal society which ask her to ‘belong’ against her own wishes.

The gardener who feels elated with his “work of artifice”, is basically a representative of the strict patriarchal society which limits the growth of a woman. The bonsai tree on the other hand, is the symbol of an oppressed woman, neatly shaped and systematically controlled so that they remain only an object of beauty, delightful to look at.

Treasure Chest A Collection of ICSE Poems Workbook Answers

The Power of Music Poem Summary, Theme, Critical Analysis by Sukumar Ray

The Power of Music Summary by Sukumar Ray

The Power of Music Poem Summary, Theme, Critical Analysis by Sukumar Ray

The Power of Music Summary

This is a poem by Sukumar Ray and the poem speaks about Bhisma Lochan Sharma who sings during the summer season. He sings with such loudness of his voice that the songs can be heard all over from the hills to the plains. The songs can also be heard from Delhi to Burma. Bhisma Lochan Sharma sings as if he has put his life at stake or risked his life.

He sings in such a way that he doesn’t care, of what might happen. Since he loves to sing, he goes on singing and does not care for anything on his way. All the people on the road are awe-struck when Bhisma Lochan starts singing. They start running about in a disorganized way and get trampled frantically when they try to escape from the strain of Bhisma Lochan’s song. They plead and request him to stop his song as soon as possible or else they will die due to the cacophony.

Bhisma Lochan’s song not only has effects on the humans but his song also has effects on the animals. The bullock-carts turn over, the horses start neighing in panic. But nothing happens to Bhisma Lochan Sharma as he is unconcerned and unaware of all these effects. The moment Bhisma Lochan starts singing the poor animals start screaming in irritation.

The fishes dive into the lake to avoid the sound of his song. They dive in as if in search of peace. The moment Bhisma starts to sing, the trees collapse and shake and their crash can be heard far away. The birds also flip over in the sky by hearing Bhisma’s ear-piercing and deafening melody.

All of them plead Bhisma Lochan to stop his singing or else they will die. But no matter how much the people, animals and birds plead to Bhisma, he does not stop singing. Then comes a male goat who is described as a sagacious fellow because he is clever and has a vivid understanding and knowledge of how to stop Bhisma Lochan. So he decides to teach him a lesson and ends his raucous song. He charges Bhisma with his horns and tosses Bhisma high up into the air. This incident brings back Bhisma to sense and he stops his song and everyone is relieved as they are also able to get back to their senses.

The Power of Music About the Author Sukumar Ray

Sukumar Ray was a Bengali writer and poet from the Indian sub continent. He was born on 30th October, 1887 in Kolkata and died on 10th September 1923. He was the son of Upendrakishor Ray Chowdhury who was famous for writing stories for the children. He was the father of the famous Indian filmmaker Satyajit Ray.

Sukumar Ray after passing the Entrance Examination from the City School, took BSc in Chemistry from Presidency College. He then went to England on the Guruprasanna Ghosh Scholarship to study photography and printing technology. He studied at the Manchester School of Technology, where he proved the effectiveness of photo printing in half tone invented by his father. He was a versatile genius. He used to compose rhymes at an early age. Along with photography he leamt painting. He used to write comedies and act in them while he was at college. He composed some songs

during the Swadeshi Movement. His prominent writings include Abol-Tabol (1923), Ha-Ja -Ba-Ra -La (1928), Pagla Dashu (1940). Bahurupi (1944), Khaikhai (1950), Abak Jalpan, Jhalapala etc. He also wrote some serious essays in Bengali and English. He also wrote Hesoramer Dairy written in the form of a diary (Dulal Bhowmik).

The Power of Music Theme

The poem revolves round the power of music. Music actually supports our physical, mental and emotional health. Good music helps us to combat depression, anxiety, stress thereby lifting our moods. We need to listen to music because it gives us energy, soothes us, motivates us and encourages us.

But in this poem the poet highlights the power of the bad music that also ultimately changes the actions, moods and ideas of the people who listen to it in the sense that they become irritated and disturbed and all the elements of nature including animals, birds, human beings, trees, sky and even the mansions show their distaste towards the bad music which seems like a cacophony to them.

The Power of Music Critical Analysis

In the poem “The Power of Music,” Sukumar Ray speaks of the effects of bad music on us. It is actually a funny poem having a nonsense verse. It is written for the amusements of the readers. He opens the poem with the main protagonist Bhisma Lochan Sharma who is a very bad singer. His song can be heard with the onset of summer season on hills and plains and from Delhi to Burma.

We find him how he continues with his singing thinking that he has a lovely voice. But he is not aware of the fact how the others are feeling when they hear his songs which are harsh, irritating and ear piercing for the others. So as soon as people hear his song, they start leaving the place in shock. Though they know that Bhisma Lochan Sharma is singing his song with good intentions, yet his song is so violent that the people have no other options but to run away.

While mining here and there, many people are crushed or trampled and we find them panic-stricken, pale, weak and sick. So they request and plead Bhisma Lochan Sharma to stop singing as they will die. He sings in such a way as if he has risked his own life.

He doesn’t listen to the people and stop his singing because we find him ‘hell-bent’-determined to continue with his song, no matter what happens around him. Through the line “The people, dazed, retire well-meant”- the poet highlights a funny moment in the poem.

There are also other impacts of his harsh music. The bullock-carts on the roadside are overturned and the horses, along the roadside shout and rise their feet up in the air looking confused. They are unable to bear the terrible singing of Bhisma Lochan Sharma.

The horses which have fallen on the roadside are the ‘wretched brutes’ here. We find how the fishes also react to his songs. They swim deep down inside the lake to save themselves from the terrible pain of Bhisma Lochan’s singing. All the animals, big or small react to his songs.

The tall trees also suddenly start trembling and shaking and are uprooted and they collapse. The sound of the collapse can be heard till the distance, of a mile. Not only on the earth, we also find the elements flying in the sky, reacting to Bhisma Lochan Sharma’s songs.

The birds that fly in the sky are disturbed in their flight so they lose control on their wings and turn like turtles or turn upside down. All the people once again plead him to stop singing. But instead of stopping, the voice of him grows loud which becomes unendurable for them. We find Bhisma Lochan relentless as he wants to share his talent with everyone.

People’s request are unheard and go all in vain. Now we find the sky itself to wail by hearing the song. The line “The welkin weeps to hear his screech” shows how Bhisma Lochan’s song seems to be so screeching that the sky also weeps and the mighty mansions tumble. Though these are exaggerating comments yet they arouse in the readers fun, laughter, specially to the children.

The funniest moment of the poem is reached with the entiy of a wise male goat. He understands the situation around, the condition of the people, animals, birds, fishes and decides to stop Bhisma Lochan Sharma from singing his ‘grating’ songs. In this sense he is wise as we find him to save everyone from the pain of Bhisma Lochan’s music.

So he boldly comes and bending his neck with his horns rising up in the air, starts running towards Bhisma Lochan making a loud noise (bellow) and hits him who has been still singing his song with the top of his voice. Singing Bhisma is tossed up high into the air by the sudden hit of the mighty and wise billy goat. This incident stops his song and thus everyone is relieved as they are able to get back their senses. Thus it is like a gift of silence for the whole world.

So we can find here how through ‘ bellow answ’ ring bellow’ everything returns to normal. This expression ‘bellow answering bellow’ implies ‘an eye for an eye’. In other words to reply someone in the same way that he or she does. In the poem the goat replies Bhisma Lochan in the same violent way as Bhisma Lochan’s violent song has brought about to everyone.

So we find the main attraction of this poem lies in its exaggerated comments and the funny moments that have been portrayed by the poet. These make the poem funny and interesting to the readers. The poem therefore is not so serious but is a funny one which gives the reader amusement.

The Power of Music Title of the Story

The poem “The Power Of Music” as the title implies, is a poem which tells us about the power of music or how powerful music is. Through this poem we come to know of what a music can do. Music has got many benefits. It affects our lives as it has the ability to affect our mental states and thus raise our moods. It rejuvenates our mind, gives us energy, motivates us, improves our health physically, mentally and spiritually. It soothes our mind and soul as it acts as a balm when we are weary. It makes us free from stress and gives us relief.

It can encourage us and when we feel deflated, it can re-inspire us. These are all the good effects of music. But in this poem we find how the poet has shown the adverse effects of music. He tries to say that if a music is harsh and violent, it seems to disturb everyone. A cacophony doesn’t act as a balm of mind, soul or body. No one likes to hear unmelodious tune or strain. So in the poem we find how the poet displays the unmelodious and raucous strain of the man named Bhisma Lochan Sharma. Bhisma Lochan Sharma sings with the onset of summer.

His strain is so violent and piercing that it pierces the hills and the plains. The strain with which he sings travels from Delhi to Burma. He sings so profusely that it seems that he has risked or staked his life. He is determined to sing whatever happens or occurs. The people become so irritated and infuriated that they are left bewildered and they leave the place and mn away from there frantically.

Though the people are aware of the fact that Bhisma Lochan Sharma sings with good intentions, yet the very harshness of his music and voice seem to drive them mad. While running they are trampled in panic and are left in pale and sickly condition. The people who have nothing to do to save their lives, at last plead and request Bhisma Lochan Sharma to stop singing as quickly as possible.

Not only the people, the bullock-carts are also overturned. The horses neigh as if to show their resentment. But he is determined to sing and so he is unconcerned of the request that is being done to him. He goes on singing or “booming out his broadside.” Bhisma Lochan Sharma’s song is said to be blare which the horses hear and they start to whine and stare in a confused manner and raise up their feet in the air. So we can well understand from here that Bhisma Lochan Sharma is not at all a good singer.

Not only the creatures present on land have effects of Bhisma Lochan’s song but his song also has effects on the fishes which dive deep into the water in order to pursue peace which they think, they will find there. The natural objects 1 like the trees collapse and shake and the sound with which they fall can be heard a mile away.

The birds in the sky while flying lose balance on their wings and turn upside down when they hear Bhisma Lochan’s song. The people again plead and request Bhisma Lochan to pause his singing but however they plead and complain, his song grows more louder.

The sky also shows its detestation towards Bhisma Lochan’s song by crying. The tall mighty mansions seem to shake. So we can see how the song of Bhisma Lochan has very bad effects on everyone. All of them react in their own manners. These are all the bad effects of music that are shown here. These bad effects of the music are shown in the poem to amuse the readers.

Through funny and exaggerating words and moments in the poem, the poet makes it interesting. Also the contents of the poem are not incongruous with the title of the poem. The power of music is proved in the poem. The music of Bhisma Lochan Sharma has the power to turn the world into a boisterous, noisy place with people running, trees collapsing, mansions shaking and the animals, birds, fishes all reacting in a strange way. All of them are trying to save themselves from the grip of Bhisma Lochgan’s powerful music.

So in other words we can say how Bhisma Lochan’s song or music turns the world into a topsy-turvy state. After this we find the music of Bhisma Lochan to be stopped by a wise male goat. He comes and with his horns, he charges straight to Bhisma Lochan who we is still singing his song. Thus Bhisma Lochan is tossed along with his “strains of song” and all comes to an end.

Bhidsma Lochan, we find, to grant the world with gift of silence ultimately. The whole world turns to silence and serenity. The whole poem, we see deals with that power of music, which is able to change the situation of the whole world. Hence we can say that the title “The Power of Music” for this poem is applicable and befitting with the contents of it.

The Power of Music About The Poem

The poem “The Power Of Music” written by Sukumar Ray is a nonsense children’s verse. It has been translated from Bengali to English by Prof. Sukanta Chaudhari. The poem is about the eccentric character of Bhisma Lochan Sharma. We find him singing his legendary tunes in the summer which are heard from Delhi to Burma. His singing is not definitely of the highest quality so it disturbs whoever hears it.

People plead with him to stop singing but Bhisma Lochan Sharma is relentless and must share his talent democratically with all. It doesn’t make any difference to Bhisma Lochan Sharma as he is doing what he loves. While he sings songs we find different beings in nature reacting. We find the bullocks, horses, fish, birds reacting according to their own ways. The trees crash and fall. Only the billy goat takes action, chasing and crashing into him causing Bhisma Lochan Sharma to stop singing and giving the world the gift of much needed silence and serenity.

The Power of Music Main Point Of The Poem

The poem “The Power of Music” by Sukumar Ray tells about the power that a music has got. Music has the ability to bring joy and comfort, to motivate us and to help us relax. These are all the positive effects of the music but this poem is a funny one dealing with the negative effects of the music. In the poem we find how Bhisma Lochan Sharma through his songs, disturb the people who listen to his songs.

It tells us about how the people, animals, birds and even the trees or in other words all the elements of nature react in different ways since they cannot endure the ‘strain’ with which Bhisma Lochan Sharma sings his songs. Instead of sweet to their ears, his songs seem to be harsh and grating. The songs pierce so much in the ears that everyone requests him to stop his song. But he doesn’t pay any heed to their requests. At last a billy goat comes and replies him in the same violent way as his song has brought about to everyone.

The Power of Music Linewise Summary

1. When summer comes, we hear the hums
Bhisma Lochan Sharma.
You catchhis strain on hill and plain from
Delhi down to Burma
He sings as though he’s staked his life, he sings
as though he’s hell-bent;
The people, dazed, retire amazed althouth they know it’s well-meant
They’re trampled in the panic rout or languish
Pale and sickly,

In these lines the poet Sukumar Ray introduces the main character of the poem, Bhisma Lochan Sharma to us as a singer who is said to sing song with the onset of the summer season. He sings with such a strain that the hills and the plains seem to overflow with it. The song of Bhisma Lochan Sharma is carried from Delhi to Burma. He sings in such a violent way as if he has staked or risked his own life.

Listening to his song, the people are left confused and they leave the place with shock. Although they know that Bhisma Lochan Sharma sings with good intentions but still they can’t help from running away from his song because the harsh, violent song of Bhisma Lochan Sharma becomes unbearable for them. While running, some of them are trampled in panic and are left in pale, weak and sickly condition.
.
2. And plead, ‘My friend, we’re near our end, oh
stop your singing quickly!’
The bullock-carts are overturned, and horses
line the roadside;
But Bhisma Lochan, unconcerned, goes
booming out his broadside.
The wretched brutes resent the blare the hour
they hear it sounded,
They whine and stare with feet in air or wonder
quite confounded.

Being restive, impatient and irritated by Bhisma Lochan’s song they plead and request Bhisma Lochan Sharma to stop his singing as quick as possible as they are near their ends. The impact of his song overturns the bullock-carts. The horses also start to react to the songs with disdain. They rise up with feet high up in the air,they are confused and unable to bear the terrible singing of Bhisma. The horses which fall down on the roadside are said to be wretched brutes.

3. The fishes dived below the lake in frantic search for silence
The very trees collapse and shake – you hear the crash a mile hence-
And in the sky the feathered fly turn turtle while they’re winging,
Again we cry, ‘we’re going to die, oh won’t you stop your singing?’
But Bhisma’s soared beyond our reach, howe’er we plead and grumble;
The welkin weeps to hear his screech, and mighty mansions tumble.

The fishes in the lakes also find the song to be cacophonous and unmelodious and so in order to find silence, they dive below the lake. The trees also shake and collapse or fall down by the dissonance. The crashing of the trees can be felt even a mile away. The birds which fly in the sky seem to lose their balance of their wings and so they turn upside down like turtles when they hear the song of Bhisma Lochan Sharma. The people again for the second time request Bhisma Lochan to stop his singing as they are going to die if it is not stopped soon.

But however they plead and request, Bhisma Lochan turns a deaf ear to them and doesn’t seem to be concerned of their peace. He continues with his song because first of all he loves to sing and secondly he wants to share his talent with everyone. Even the sky seems to weep when he hears Bhisma Lochan’s screech. The strong tall buildings shake as if they will fall. These are all the effects that an unmelodious and vociferous song can do.

4. But now there comes a billy goat, a most sagacious fellow,
He downs his horns and charges straight, with bellow answering bellow.
The strains of song are tossed and whirled by blast of brutal violence,
And Bhisma Lochan grants the world the golden gift of silence.

But at last Bhisma Lochan Sharma’s song come to an end. A wise billy goat comes and charges Bhisma Lochan straight with his horns, with bellow answ’ring bellow or an eye for an eye. The meaning of this expression is that a person who causes another person to suffer should suffer in an equal amount.

In other words, the people, animals, birds everyone have been suffering due to Bhisma Lochan’s discordant song. At last Bhisma Lochan suffers when the goat comes, hits and tosses him up high into the air. This action of the goat is said to be “blast of brutal violence”. Thus Bhisma Lochan Sharma stops his song and everyone in the world receives a gift of silence.

The Power of Music Linewise Explanation

1. When summer comes, we hear the hums
Bhisma Lochan Sharma.
You catchhis strain on hill and plain from
Delhi down to Burma
He sings as though he’s staked his life, he sings
as though he’s hell-bent;
The people, dazed, retire amazed althouth they
know it’s well-meant

With the onset of the summer season, one can hear the songs of Bhisma Lochan Sharma, singing with harshness. We can catch the strain flowing on hills and plains and from Delhi to Burma. His song has such a harsh strain and he sings it with such harshness that it seems he has staked or risked his life. It seems that he is determined to sing whatever comes on his way. The people seem to be bewildered and so they run here and there although they know -that Bhisma Lochan Sharma sings with good intentions.

2. They’re trampled in the panic rout or languish
Pale and sickly,
And plead, ‘My friend, we’re near our end, oh
stop your singing quickly!’
The bullock-carts are overturned, and horses
line the roadside;
But Bhisma Lochan, unconcerned, goes
booming out his broadside

The people run here and there and get trampled in panic and become pale, sick and weak. They have nothing to do other than pleading Bhisma Lochan to stop his song quickly otherwise they will die. The defeaning sound becomes unbearable for everyone and so the bullock-carts are overturned. The horses on the roadside start neighing. But Bhisma Lochan is unconcerned to their request and goes ‘booming out his broadside’ or his song doesn’t stop.

3. The wretched brutes resent the blare the hour
they hear it sounded,
They whine and stare with feet in air or wonder
quite confounded.
The fishes dived below the lake in frantic search
for silence
The very trees collapse and shake – you hear the
crash a mile hence-

The horses hearing the blare or the defeaning boisterous song of Bhisma Lochan, show resentment and raising their forelegs high up in the air they whine and stare in wonder and confusion. The fishes seem to dive below the lake in search of silence frantically. The big trees shake and collapse and the sound of the crashing can be heard a mile away.

4. And in the sky the feathered fly turn turtle while
they’re winging,
Again we cry, ‘we’re going to die, oh won’t you
stop your singing?’
But Bhisma’s soared beyond our reach, howe’er
we plead and grumble;
The welkin weeps to hear his screech, and mighty
mansions tumble.

The birds while flying in the sky,turn upside down losing control on their wings when they hear the vociferous song of Bhisma Lochan Sharma. The people again start pleading him to stop singing as they are about to die. But Bhisma Lochan Sharma’s song grow louder inspite of the request. The sky also seems to weep to hear his cacophony. The mighty tall houses shake as if they will collapse.

5. But now there comes a billy goat, a most sagacious fellow,
He downs his horns and charges straight, with bellow answering bellow.
The strains of song are tossed and whirled by blast of brutal violence,
And Bhisma Lochan grants the world the golden gift of silence.

But then comes a wise male goat ,who charges straight with his horns down and tosses Bhisma Lochan Sharma. Bhisma Lochan’s bellow has been answered by the bellow of the billy goat. The expression of “bellow answering bellow” means that the person who causes another person to suffer should suffer in an equal amount. So due to the violent action of the male goat Bhisma Lochan’s violent song comes to an end and thus the world is gifted with silence and serenity.

The Power of Music Annotations and Vocabulary

Strain — tensity; music being played or sung
Staked — bet
Trampled — crushed under or stepped on
Rout — a chaotic situation of defeat
Languish — weaken; deteriorate
Wretched — feeling ill or unhappy
Booming — here, speaking very loudly
Confounded — confused and annoyed
Broadside — an aggressive attack in words
Turn turtle — turn upside down
Plead — beg
Grumble — to complain bitterly
Resent — feel bitterness or indignation at
Welkin — sky
Sagacious — wise
Winging — flying
Bellow — an angry loud shout
Blare — a loud harsh sound

Treasure Chest A Collection of ICSE Poems Workbook Answers

A Considerable Speck Poem Summary, Theme, Critical Analysis by Robert Frost

A Considerable Speck Summary by Robert Frost

A Considerable Speck Poem Summary, Theme, Critical Analysis by Robert Frost

A Considerable Speck Summary

The poem of Robert Frost “A Considerable Speck” is a simple poem that does not deal with any serious themes directly. The situation of the poem is such that the writer happens to see a mite on a white sheet of paper on which he was writing. He observes the movement of that tiny microscopic creature and reflects back on the modern life of regimentation and leaves the mite there to act in its own way.

Through this he intended to show the display of his own mind when he encountered the speck. The mite here is said to be a speck. He felt that though tiny, it was considerable because that little mite made him think of its effect on his mind.

In this poem the poet says that he saw a speck. It would have been out of his sight, if it would not have appeared on a blank white sheet of paper. The white background of the paper made the speck visible to his eyes. It was the paper or the manuscript on which the poet was writing. When he saw the speck, he wished to stop it by a drop of ink from his pen.

But then something strange about the speck made him think over. He was comprehending as to what the speck was of. He thought that it was not a speck of dust that could have blown by his breathing. Then he saw that it was unmistakably a mite which was also a living creature like him. It had certain inclinations of its own as it was also living in its self-engrossed world. The poet took a pause and very gracefully waited for the mite to move.

The poet says that the mite paused, possibly it thought that the poet would do something to it. After the pause it suddenly raced again and came to a place where the poet had just written. We feel very surprised when we see how the poet says that even a little creature like the mite reacted and paused. It either tasted or smelt the ink which was probably wet on his manuscript. It showed its distaste and then again turned to fly away and escape. Then the poet says that it did nothing but used reason like the poet.

It had no desire to die so it ran with fear. Then again the poet describes the mite to be cunning. It crept and again hesitated. We find here that it had no intention to face death, therefore it ran down on the sheet of paper with terror and cunningness. Like this the mite came in the middle of the sheet or the speaker’s manuscript.

As it reached the middle of the sheet of paper it bent down, as if waiting for the judgement of the poet, possibly with the thought of accepting what the poet would do to it or accepting its own fate. Now we can see how the poet feels about it. The poet was not like the modem men who were swept away by the sense of purpose and selfishness.

So he didn’t want to kill the mite. The poet refrained from killing it not because he believed in “collectivistic regimenting love” but because he believed the mite to be an intelligent creature which should be given an opportunity to live. The microscopic item looked “considerable” to the poet. So he let it lie there as it was. The poet says that he was not so insensible as he also had a mind.

Having a mind himself, the poet recognized mind which he found it in any shape. Indeed he found it glad to find on any sheet of paper “the least display of mind.” He was glad that a small creature like the mite could rouse in the poet the display of mind. So here in this poem we find how Robert Frost intended to show the display of his mind when he encountered the speck.

A Considerable Speck About the Author Robert Frost

Robert Lee Frost was born on March 26, 1874 in San Francisco. Frost’s father was an editor of San Francisco evening BULLETINGAfter his father’s death, his family moved in Lawrence. He graduated from the Lawrence High School in the year 1892.

After that he went to the Darmouth College. He was a celebrated American poet. His work was initially published in England before it was published in the United States. He had a great mastery of American colloquial speech and made realistic depictions of the early rural life.

His great work in poetry mostly included settings from the rural life in New England in early 20th century. He sold his first poem in the year 1894, MY BUTTERFLY: AN ELEGY which appeared in the New York Independent in November 1894 edition. In 1915 he had his first poetry book,” A Boy’s Will” published.

Some famous and best poems of Robert Frost are Mending Wall, Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening, Birches, The Road Not Taken, Fire And Ice etc Robert Frost was nominated for the Nobel Prize in literature 31 times. He won Pulitzer Prizes many times and Bollingen Prize in 1963. He died in January 29, 1963 at the age of 88.

A Considerable Speck Theme

The poem “A Considerable Speck” deals with actually the importance of the human proficiencies of the mind and feelings. The poet has appreciated the mind in a straight forward manner in this poem. The theme of this poem is more specifically the importance of the ‘display of mind’ on any ‘sheet of paper.’

A Considerable Speck Critical Analysis

“A Considerable Speck” of Robert Frost is a meditation on the importance of the human capability of imagination and thought. The speaker is the writer who, before completing his writing, saw “a speck that would have been beneath his sight,” but it was visible to him because of the white background of his sheet of paper. He introduces the poem in a captivating manner, indicating the reader, that something was about to occur. The writer (poet) poised his pen in the air to stop the mite with a drop of ink on the paper.

But this microscopic mite grabbed the attention of the poet (writer) and made him think deeply. He was wonder struck and fascinated with the minute creature as it raced across the white sheet of paper. We find how Robert Frost has used over statement to emphasize the actions of the speck on his manuscript paper, revealing his ironic sympathy and appreciation for its efforts despite its minuscule size. We find that first the speaker thought the speck to be blown dust due to his breath but then he saw that it was unmistakably a living mite.

The word “living” is used to compare the mite with himself or other living creatures. “With inclination it could call its own” the speaker here we find how carefully examined the actions of the mite in details, as if it was a complex being with emotions and intelligence. He says that the mite also had an inclination of its own.

The imagery used by the speaker is vivid in description, describing the mite in details. Although it is presumed that the speaker would be unable to distinguish the microscopic mite’s movements to that precise detail, yet we find him to be able to point out characteristics that link it to humans and other living creatures. So in the first stanza the speaker describes the mite using imagery, evoking lifelike images in the mind.

Then in the second stanza we find the speaker’s attitude towards the “speck”. He says that the mite came racing j wildly and reached the portion of his manuscript where the ink had not dried. It paused again, as either it drank or smelt the ink and with hatred and abhorrence, it turned to fly. The way the speaker uses the phrase “paused again smelt/with loathing to fly” helps the readers in visualizing the actions of the mite.

The speaker (writer) felt that the insect was too small to have any legs, but then thought that it must have a complete set, since it was walking. It ran in terror and expressed how much it didn’t want to die. And next we find how the speaker says that it l paused and hesitated and then trembling in fear at last reached the middle of the paper and finally accepted its fate of facing the reality that is whatever the man would do to it, it would accept it. When the mite surrendered in fear, the mind of the writer became more activated with several thoughts.

The third stanza concludes the poem with the speaker’s justification for not killing the helpless mite. Here we can say that he has justified his lack of physical actions regarding the microscopic creature by claiming that he had no valid reason to harm it in any way. The last section includes the appreciation of the mind wherever it is present: at this point he also adds some ironical remarks and suggestions about the inhumanity of wars in the modem world. The poet here has used the technique of irony.

He says that he doesn’t have the “collectivistic regimenting love with which the modern world is being swept”. This means that he doesn’t have the ‘love’ of being able to destroy masses of people collectively, and so he could not kill the mite out of the simple anger for being trespassing on his manuscript page. We also find that the poet is satirizing the modem man who is able to destroy masses for small reasons. Then he says that since the mite did not want any evil against him, so he let the mite lie there on the paper till it slept.

The poet then finally claims that he respected the presence of ‘mind’ anywhere, suggesting that he respected and appreciated the mite for its actions. Here indirectly he is satirizing the modem man who lacks the mind to understand that it is foolish to kill wise. The poet felt glad to find that “mind” was displayed “on any sheet of paper.” We can say that here the mind represents the human faculties for imagination, sensibility, sympathy, kindness, love and above all the intelligence that makes us able to think and judge.

A Considerable Speck Title of the Story

“A Considerable Speck” gives the reader a hint of the direction of the-poem. We can see how the poet has chosen a title that is also a paradox. “Considerable” implies importance and significance, while “speck” implies worthlessness. From the beginning of the poem we find how the poet uses imagery to describe the mite in details by saying that he saw a speck falling on a white sheet of paper.

The speck, he said, would have been out of his sight if it did not appear in the white sheet which was his manuscript. Since he was writing on it, he thought to stop the speck by a period of ink of his pen. But something strange about the speck forced him to think over. He saw that it was not a speck of dust that had been blown by his breathing but it was a living mite without any mistake. Till here, we see how the poet says about the speck which is just a microscopic thing. We find how the poet mentions the speck to be a worthless thing.

But from the line “When something strange about it made me think,” the poet highlights the effects of that microscopic things and says that something strange about the speck made him to think. From this line onwards we can see how the poet gives importance to the specks and regards it to be considerable. Then again he says how he observes that this speck had its own proficiency or inclinations. It used this inclination to stop with suspicion that aroused in it, due to the poet’s pen.

And so it came racing on wildly to the place of the manuscript where the ink was not dried. It paused for some moments as it accidentally smelt or drank (tasted) the ink and so with abomination, it turned to fly and escape. So in the poem we find how the poet gradually turns the mere speck into an object of importance. This was the time when the poet used his intelligence and reason. The speck or the mite was too small to have legs but the poet says that it must have had a set of complete legs as it was seen racing and turning to fly.

Then again the poet says that the mite didn’t want to face death, so it ran terrified and crept cunningly. It also hesitated and in this way it came to the middle of the manuscript where it was found to bent down in desperation to accept it’s fate. It was in desperation because it is the nature of the living beings to defend themselves from danger and death and so the mite being a living creature also tried to save itself desperately. It was seen at last to accept whatever the poet decided to do it.

After reading, till here we see how the poet in a very smooth manner gradually changes the speck to a living mite with it’s own inclinations, having intelligence which is the utmost necessity of a living being. He then says that he was against the collectivistic regimenting love with which the people of the modem world was being swept. So he, says that mite to be a poor microscopic item again and since it had done no evil, he let it to live there on his manuscript till it slept.

In the last four lines, the poet gives emphasize on the mind. He appreciated the mite for displaying it’s mind on the paper. The poet was so glad that such a small creature could rouse in him, the display of mind. So first we are led to a belief that the speck is only noticeable due to its contrasting against the paper next we are told it is significant because it could think when we expected it to be thoughtless, lifeless speck of dust. However, perhaps it is considered only for what it signifies: we know logically that this intelligent mite cannot have existed.

May be Frost has referred to the minuscule “ mind” to the thoughtless process by which the humans run around their lives helplessly, without achieving nothing. On the other hand, the mite is said to have mind displaying intelligence on the sheet of paper by reacting according to the situation that came in front of it.

So though we find the title to be somewhat oxymoronic, as we can’t expect such a small object to be of any importance, yet in the contents of the poem, the speck is shown to be significant and having effects on the poet’s mind. Hence thought it is a speck, it can be considered important or can be said considerable, hence the title of the poem given as “A considerable Speck” can be said to be relevant.

A Considerable Speck About The Poem

This poem “A Considerable Speck” is a witty poem. In the poem Robert Frost speaks of a living microscopic mite which he observes on a white sheet of paper. By seeing this he presumes that the mite seems to have its own inclinations. The mite is living in its self-engrossed world and it is having some desires which are totally its own.

When the mite smells the wet ink and perhaps tastes it from the paper in which the poet was writing, it runs terrified with some cunningness and avoids the writer’s or the poet’s pen for it has no desire to die. The poet desists from killing it, not because of any belief in “collectivistic regimenting love”, but because he appreciates the mite for being intelligent. He feels glad to find “on any sheet the least display of mind”. So he allows the mite to lie down on the paper with the hope that it had slept.

A Considerable Speck Main Point Of The Poem

In the poem “A Considerable Speck” we find a mere mite which is microscopic in size has more intelligence than a human being. A mere mite with intelligence is to be preferred to a human being who is a dullard. In this poem, we see that Frost does not indiscriminately accept all human
beings irrespective of their intelligence.

We also see Frost’s ability to turn a trivial thing like a mite into an occasion of significance-here a reflection on intelligence. The poem can be described as a satire on dullards. Not only this the poem also tells us to be careful in making decisions in life. One should be very wise and careful while making choices in his/her life because our choices shape our future.

A Considerable Speck Linewise Summary

1. A speck that would have been beneath my sight
On any but a paper sheet so white
Set off across what I had written there.
And I had idly poised my pen in air
To stop it with a period of ink
When something strange about it made me think,
This was no dust speck by my breathing blown,
But unmistakably a living mite
With inclinations it could call its own.
It paused as with suspicion of my pen,
And then came racing wildly on again

Robert Frost in the beginning of his poem “A Considerable Speck” presents a speck that would have been beyond his sight, if it was not in a white sheet of paper on which he was writing. He was able to see a dot like thing just because it was a contrast on the white paper. He says that seeing the speck he poised his pen in the air in an idle manner to stop this speck with a period of ink but then something strange about it stopped it from doing so. The ‘speck’ grabbed the attention of the poet and made him think.

He thought that it was no speck blown by his breathing but he saw that it was unmistakably a mite which was a living creature like the humans or other animals. The poet thought that since it was a living creature therefore it had certain inclination of its own. It was also living in its self-absorbed world with its own inclination. The mite also paused and possibly it thought that the writer would do something to it or it suspected for something to be done to it by the writer. So it came running again wildly on his manuscript

2. To where my manuscript was not yet dry;
Then paused again and either drank or smelt —
With loathing, for again it turned to fly.
Plainly with an intelligence I dealt.
It seemed too tiny to have room for feet,
Yet must have had a set of them complete
To express how much it didn’t want to die.
It ran with terror and with cunning crept
It faltered; I could see it hesitate;
Then in the middle of the open sheet
Cower down in desperation to accept

As the mite raced wildly on the paper it came to the portion where the writer had written and was wet with ink. Most probably the mite had either smelled or drank the ink. The poet here did not forget to express the reaction of this microscopic creature. So he says that when it tasted the ink, it turned to fly with hatred and detestation.

When the writer saw it moving, flying, walking, running, he says that he dealt this intelligently. It was too tiny to have feet or legs but then the writer (speaker) thought that since it was walking it had a complete set of legs. Then the poet says how clever and cunning the mite was.

The mite was reluctant to die and so to express it, “it ran with terror and cunning crept.” It stopped for a moment and hesitated and when it reached the middle of the poet’s manuscript, it bent down waiting for his judgement. Most probably it had no options but to accept his fate and so it surrendered itself on the will and the judgement of the poet.

The poet through the lines 22 and 23 “Cower down in desperation to accept/ Whatever I accorded it to fate” — upholds the intelligence of the mite by saying that it bent down in desperation to accept or surrender its fate. It was aware of its anticipated danger and so it surrendered itself by bending down,before the writer or the poet.

3. Whatever I accorded it to fate
I have none of the tenderer-than-thou
Collectivistic regimenting love
With which the modern world is being swept.
But this poor microscopic item now!
Since it was nothing I knew evil of
I let it lie there till I hope it slept.

So we find how the mite had surrendered its fate in the hands of the writer. It was ready to accept what the writer would do to it. In these lines the poet says about the modem world, which is usually swept away by a sense of purpose and selfishness. But according to him he did not believe in this. He was not an insensible man, so he decided not to kill the mite. He says that he did not have the “collectivistic regimenting love” with which the modem world was being swept”.

He did not believe in destroying masses of people collectively so he could not kill the mite as he had a reason behind this. He says that since it was nothing and he knew that it was of no evil, he let it lie down there on the paper till it slept. Here we find how the poet had been benevolent and generous towards the mite. He could not kill it just because it trespassed on his page.

4. I have a mind myself and recognize
Mind when I meet with it in any guise
No one can know how glad I am to find
On any sheet the least display of mind.

In the end, of his poem we find the poet to respect and Vappreciate the presence of ‘mind’. Here mind is being symbolized as the human faculty or capacity which comprises of imagination, love, sympathy. Sensibility and above all intelligence that makes us able to judge, think and act accordingly. So he says that he was so glad that such a small creature like a mite could rouse in him the display of mind. Though tiny, it was considerable to him, by making him think of its effects.

A Considerable Speck Linewise Explanation

1. A speck that would have been beneath my sight
On any but a paper sheet so white
Set off across what I had written there.
And I had idly poised my pen in air
To stop it with a period of ink
When something strange about it made me think,
This was no dust speck by my breathing blown,
But unmistakably a living mite
With inclinations it could call its own.

In the above lines, the speaker or the poet says that he saw a speck. It would have been out of his sight but it was visible to him only because it appeared on a white sheet of paper, in his manuscript on which he was writing. So seeing it he wished to stop it by a period of ink from his pen.

So he poised his pen in the air. But something strange about the speck made the poet think over. He thought that it could not be a dust speck that had blown by his breathing and then he saw that unmistakably it was mite, a living creature like him. It had a certain proclivity and propensity of its own.

2. It passed as with suspicion of my pen,
And then came racing wildly on again
To where my manuscript was not yet dry;
Then paused again and either drank or smelt —
With loathing, for again it turned to fly.
Plainly with an intelligence I dealt.

The mite stopped for a certain moment with a suspicion that the poet would do something to it. Then it went racing again to a place where the poet had just written because the ink there was still wet. Then it paused again and either smelt or drank the ink and with abomination turned to fly. The poet dealt the whole thing with intelligence.

3. It seemed too tiny to have room for feet,
Yet must have had a set of them complete
To express how much it didn’t want to die.
It ran with terror and with cunning crept.
It faltered; I could see it hesitate;
Then in the middle of the open sheet
Cower down in desperation to accept.
Whatever I accorded it to fate.

Here the poet says that the mite was too small or too tiny to have feet, but then he thought that it had a complete set of legs as he saw it running with terror and creeping cunningly because it did not wish to die. Then again the poet saw it to be hesitating.

When the mite was in the middle of the manuscript it bent down as if waiting for the writer or the poet’s judgement, possibly accepting or agreeing to what he would do to it.lt surrendered to the poet on whom its fate depended.

4. I have none of the tenderer-than-thou
Collectivistic regimenting love
With which the modern world is being swept.
But this poor microscopic item now!
Since it was nothing I knew evil of
I let it lie there till I hope it slept.

The poet says that he did not wish to kill the mite because he did not believe in “collectivistic regimenting of love with which the modem world was being swept.” He says that he did not have the love of being able to destroy masses of people collectively which the modem world was swept with. A modem man is swept away by a sense of purpose and selfishness. He knew that the mite could not do any evil and so the poet let it lie there till he hoped it slept.

5. I have a mind myself and recognize
Mind when I meet with it in any guise
No one can know how glad I am to find
On any sheet the least display of mind.

In these lines the poet says that he respects the presence of ‘mind’, anywhere, suggesting that he respects and appreciates the mite for its mind. So he expresses his feelings of appreciation towards the display of mind in any text or sheet which the mite showed on the paper.

A Considerable Speck Annotations and Vocabulary

Speck — dot; fleck
Poised — balanced
Unmistakably — without any mistakes
Inclinations — disposition; propensity
Suspicion — intuition; speculation
Loathing — detest; abhor
Faltered — hesitate
Desperation — hopelessness; despair
Cower down — to bend down or move backward with one’s head down because of fear
Accorded — grant
Collectivistic — a political or economic theory advocating collective control
Regimenting — organising

Treasure Chest A Collection of ICSE Poems Workbook Answers

When Great Trees Fall Poem Summary, Theme, Critical Analysis by Maya Angelou

When Great Trees Fall Summary by Maya Angelou

When Great Trees Fall Poem Summary, Theme, Critical Analysis by Maya Angelou

When Great Trees Fall Summary

The poetess Maya Angelou in her poem “When Great Trees Fall” describes what happens when huge and enormous trees collapse; the impact of which shakes the rocks on the top of even the faraway hills, makes the lions crouch low in the field and even prompts the elephants to trudge off in search of shelter. Not only this when big trees collapse and fall in the woods, the little creatures curl up in the silence too shocked to be frightened. The deaths of significant people have a similar effect

on humanity. In their absence, the air feels flimsy, scarce and devoid of life. With a sudden burst of painful clarity, we gasp and see things. This loss makes our memory more precise and we keep thinking about the nice things we wish we’d said while the person was still alive. The deaths of these exceptional people upend the world for us as we know that the world was inextricably tied up with their existence.

Our souls shrivel up by the thought of their tender care and guidance. We lose our holds on our minds which were shaped and enlightened by their brilliance. Our minds become diminished, but we do not go mad or crazy. Our minds as if are returned to the unspeakable crudeness of the stone ages (dark, cold caves). We eventually begin to feel a sense of peace, though this comes in fits and starts rather than all at once.

The emptiness created by the loss of these people begins to fill up with a charged, consoling hum. The numbness fades and we are able to perceive the world again, though we will never experience things as we did before this loss. We begin to take comfort in the mere fact that this person existed once. We can go on living or go on existing and live more meaningful lives because this person once existed.

When Great Trees Fall About the Author Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou is an American author, actress, screen writer. Poet and civil rights activist best known for her 1969 memoir, I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings which made literary history as the first non-fiction best seller by an African American woman.

She was born on April 4, 1928 in St. Louis Missouri. Angelou received several honours through her career, including two NAACP Image Awards in the outstanding literary work (non-fiction) category, in 2005 and 2009. She also got many Grammy Awards.

Angelou published several collections of poetry, but the most famous was 1971’s collection Just Give Me A Cool Drink Of Water ‘fore I Die, which has been nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. Other famous collections of her poetry include And Still I Rise (1978), Shaker, Why Don’t You Sing(1983), I Shall Not Be Moved (1990), Even The Stars Look Lonesome (1997).

Her works Amazing Peace, On The Pulse Of Morning, Dawn In the Delta are also noticeable. She also wrote autobiographies one of which is A song Flung Up To Heaven. She died on May 28, 2014. Several memorials were held in her honour, including ones at Wake Forest University and Glide Memorial Church in San Francisco.

When Great Trees Fall Theme

The theme presented in the poem “When Great Trees Fall” is death. The poem speaks about the death of the beloved ones through the presentation of the collapse or fall of “great trees”. It discusses about the loss we have to face as a consequence or result of the departure of our beloved ones. It also speaks of the great influence that the departed beloved ones have in our lives. But since death is inevitable, we have to accept it. So it talks about death, loss, grief and ultimately acceptance.

When Great Trees Fall Critical Analysis

In the poem “When Great Trees Falf’Maya Angelou compares the death of the great people to the fall of the great trees in the forest. She uses symbolism and strong imagery to show a person’s response to loss.lt doesn’t matter how strong or tough we are: when any influential person in our life passes away, we feel the effects.

She says that when gigantic trees come crashing down, the impact is felt far and wide. Rocks on the distant hills feel the vibrations of the collapse of the tree. The word “shudder” suggests that the landscape itself trembles with fear. The lions” hunker down” or crouch down in tall grasses and the elephants trundle along in search of shelter.

The things like large rocks, lions, elephants are linked with steadfastness and strength. Large rocks are heavy and immobile, lions are fearsome predators-kings of the jungle and elephants are enormous, slow-moving creatures. Yet they are seen to be reacting to the falling of trees. The small animals being scared recoiled to silence or in other words the falling of great trees shakes everything around them. The great trees therefore are symbolic which represent great people, whose loss reverberates throughout the world.

She says that when great trees fall, it causes gigantic parts of nature to move and small and large members of the animal kingdom to react. The natural imagery mentioned above, sets the stage and then creates a parallel for what people do in the aftermath of a human death. Rather than speaking of trees as a stand-in for human life she addresses the “great souls” directly.

The air becomes light, rare and sterile in which we seem to breathe shortly. So as the poem progresses we find that the poetess moves on to directly speak about “great souls” and how human beings react to loss. It is like that, with the death of the great souls our vision for the world, also goes with them. It seems that the pain of such a loss erases all the good that the dead, once brought into the world. We gasp and see things with a sudden burst of sharp painful lucidity.

This loss also makes our memories more precise and we wish for the kind words to be said that has been unsaid while the person was alive and also wish for the walks that was promised once to the dead, but has not been taken. The poetess says that when the great souls die, our reality also takes leave of us.

The world which was inextricably tied up with their existence, after their death seems to upend. We relied on their tender care and guidance and now with their death our souls shrink and shrivel up. The minds that were “formed and informed” by the person’s radiance or brilliance seem to return to “ignorance.”

The world itself feel “sterile” and hostile without them. Our minds are diminished and are returned to the “dark, cold caves” or stone ages. The loss of the great souls can eat away at the heart and the soul of a human being. It leaves a gnawing pain that nothing can heal. It leaves a gaping wound that tries to heal and yet is re-opened again and again by memories and regrets.

While discussing of death, we find her using a gentle and calm tone. We also find how the poetess identifies with others who have felt this loss when she uses the second-person point of view and claims “We are not so much maddened cold caves.” The despair here is described as “dark, cold caves.”

The feelings are so strong that they are unspeakable. The poetess not only is able to identify the feeling of deep loss and anguish but she is also able to offer hope for healing through her powerful words which she uses in her poem through the general mood and the clear, simple style and diction. As we progress more, we find how the mood of the poem changes from moments of despair and depressions to ones of hope and peace.

The poetess seems to imply the time which has allowed for this healing to occur. She says that with the passage of time “after a period” one is able to feel “peace bloom” which happens “slowly and always irregularly”. This shows that even as one is slowly beginning to heal and feel peace, one still has moments of despair and anguish.

She describes the feelings in between the time of healing with a kind of soothing “electric vibrations.” She means to say that the pain of losing some loved ones still buzzes in the background but the memory of the lost person is soothing and consoling. In the back of one’s mind and in the background of all that one does, one hears the presence of the lost person. The poetess says that one hears the whisper, “they existed, they existed” which gives a new meaning to his/her life.

She admits that because of this great person existed, we can “do better.” At the end of this poem, the poetess offers hope to all those who have experienced loss. Even if they will never be same again, and even if there will always be pain and sadness, there is hope for healing and joy in the middle of the great loss. So we see that Maya Angelou in her poem speaks about the loss as a tragic one but it is inevitable part of the human life.

When Great Trees Fall Title of the Story

Maya Angelou’s poem “When Great Trees Fall” compares the death of great people to the collapsing or falling of great or huge trees in the forest’ The poetess then in her poem describes how the fallen trees and the departed souls send shockwaves throughout the nature and throughout our lives respectively.

In other words the title of the poem “When Great Trees Fall” symbolizes the death of a great person. Though the title of the poem does not match directly with the contents yet we can see that there is a connection shown through the comparison of great trees and great souls.

The speaker describes how a fall or collapse of great trees shake the earth and how the animals, big and small react to this. The rocks of the faraway hills shudder. The lions hide, hunker down in the tall grasses. The elephants lumber after safety.

The poem compares the death of the loved ones to the monumental shifts that occur when large and powerful trees fall in the forest. The human beings, big or small react when they lose some dear ones or when “great souls” die, they react to this loss.

Again the speaker says that the smaller animals recoil or rebound in silence and “their senses eroded beyond fear.” This emphasizes that the ones at loss are not even sure what they feel because their senses are being eroded beyond fear. So till here everywhere in the poem we have found how the speaker compares the loss caused by the great trees on the one hand and the loss caused by the departing of the great souls on the other hand.

From this point of view the title of the poem has a very deep meaning. In the next part of the poem, the speaker directly mentions the losses we face when some beloved of ours depart from us. She speaks of the different losses that we face. The person whom we have lost has a great influence in our lives. The speaker directly speaks of the inability of us to breathe in the air.

The air becomes light, rare and sterile and becomes unfit for us to breathe when some dear ones pass away or leave us. Once the great souls die and leave us we are able to see and understand the value of them whom we have lost and of course which are very painful. We have a short moment of “hurtful clarity”. When the loss hits us, our memory suddenly becomes sharp. We also are able to remember the moments spent with them, who have been lost.

Though these memories are precious and valuable to us, yet we feel a sharp gnaw in our souls. This sharp gnaw is a feeling of regret that comes within our souls after our beloved ones leave us or depart from us. We have the realization of the kind words that were not said to them while they were alive, or a realization of promised walks that have not been taken. All these realizations come and we are filled with regrets for not doing so. These are the effects of losing the great souls.

It has been said already that these great souls were compared to the great trees in the first portion of the poem. Then again the speaker says that when “great souls” die, it changes our reality. The person on whom we were dependent and on whose guidance and nurture our souls grew, now with the death of the person, shrink and wrinkle. Once, on whose radiance and brilliance our minds were formed and informed, now fall away after their death.

The despair in our minds and souls are “as cold dark caves.” The feelings are so strong that they are unspeakable, When the great souls die, after a short period we slowly recover and feel peace. In the background of our mind, we have the pain and anguish for the lost souls, but the memory of them, help us to be better and give us a new meaning to our life.

Our minds whisper to us and say “they existed.” So we see that the next portion of the poem has dealt with the great souls -their death, the loss we face and the impact of their death on us. From that sense the title which is given as “When Great Trees Fall” symbolizes the great souls, when they die. So the title can be said to be suitable though the title does not tell us directly of what it s means.

When Great Trees Fall About The Poem

Maya Angelou wrote “When Great Trees Fall” in 1987 after the death of her friend and fellow writer/activist James Baldwin. It is the comparison between the death of “great people” and falling of “great trees” in a forest. This poem was read out by Angelou at Baldwin’s funeral. The speaker compares the loss of “great souls” such as Baldwin to the fall of “great trees”, the impact of which can be felt in every direction.

The poem deals with the discussion of the natural world which reminds us of the inevitability and naturalness of loss. It also acknowledges that despite the inevitable loss; life has to go on and so it has to be accepted the way it is.

When great trees fall, beings big and small seem to seek safety and stability. So also when a large loss occurs, effects are felt by both big and small. The widespread disruption stands as a parallel to the effects felt by the survivors when a significant person in their lives departs. The eco system of our minds and hearts sense the change and continues for a period.

But it is the beauty of life that – just like the natural world, we also can eventually recover and revive. In the place of the departed people or the fallen trees new growths spring up. Without the empty space this would not have been possible. The cycle and continuation of life itself is a testament to what had been; for though great souls die, we can make meaning from the knowledge that they existed and touched our lives.

When Great Trees Fall Main Point Of The Poem

The poem “When Great Trees Fall” opens with a metaphor of the tree that falls. It symbolizes the loss of great person. It speaks more generally of the experience of losing someone important and the ways in which even the most poignant grief eventually gives way to acceptance. So the speaker gives a comparison and says that just as when great trees fall, the effect is felt for miles around.

In the same way, when a great soul departs, the effects are felt deep and far. The animals react when great trees fall in the forest. So also when people die, human beings react to loss. Ultimately she concludes the poem with a message of hope and renewal, suggesting that after the death of a loved one, “We can be. Be and be better. For they existed.”

When Great Trees Fall Linewise Summary

1. When great trees fall,
rocks on distant hills shudder,
lions bunker down
in tall grasses,
and even elephants
lumber after safety.

In the poem “When Great Trees Fall”, Maya Angelou,the poetess uses symbolism and strong imagery to show her response to loss. The poem begins with “When Great Trees Fall” which symbolizes the loss of great people. When a great tree falls,it is felt for miles around. The rocks of the distant hills which are immovable, seem to shudder. This symbolizes the ways in which the death causes people, even distant people, to feel disheartened. The lions hunker down in tall grasses.

The lions are beasts of power, bravery and strength. So it doesn’t matter how strong or tough we are, we feel the effects when an influential person in our life passes away. Even the elephants which are so enormous in size lumber after safety and look for their shelter when great trees fall. The elephants symbolize that even the great, known people also react when they lose some loved ones.

2. When great trees fall
in forests,
small things recoil into silence,
their senses
eroded beyond fear.

When the great trees in the forest fall, even the small things in the forest “recoil” or shrink in silence. They are not even sure what they feel for their senses are eroded beyond fear. This suggests that when a great soul die, the loss is even felt among the small. This could mean that physically small or children feel the effects of the loss as much as their old counterparts.

It could also mean that those who are unknown, without fame or political significance, feel the effects of the loss just as the great minds feel it. They have no words to comfort. The loss of a dear one makes the hearts and souls numb.

3. When great souls die,
the air around us becomes
light, rare, sterile.

We breathe, briefly.
Our eyes, briefly, see with
a hurtful clarity.

When a great soul dies, the air in which we breathe, even seems to become light and sterile. It is hard to breathe when one has lost an important loved one. We also have a brief or short moment of “hurtful clarity”. With our minds full of grief and pain we are able to see lucidly and understand clearly, what a valuable soul we have lost.

4. Our memory, suddenly sharpened,
examines,
gnaws on kind words
unsaid,
promised walks
never taken.

When a loss hits us, suddenly our memory is sharpened and we are able to remember the moments spent with the one who has been lost. These memories though precious, also feel like a dagger to the soul. It is then we have the feelings of regret.

When we lose a loved person we regret the “kind words” that have been unsaid to the departed soul. The memories of the lost person also make us think about the walks we had once promised with the person but is never taken. Having never fulfilled those promises leaves us with a gnawing pain of despair and regret.

5. Great souls die and
our reality, bound to them,
takes leave of us.
Our souls,
dependent upon their
nurture,
now shrinks, wizened.

We undergo a mental and an emotional grief for losing someone close. The loss of a “great soul” means the loss of a soul that had a great impact on our everyday lives. This loss alters our reality. The death of the person on whose guidance and nurture we depended, leaves us feeling small. So our souls seem to shrink and wizened.

6. Our minds, formed
and informed by their
radiance, fall away.
We are not so much maddened
as reduced to the unutterable ignorance or
dark, cold ;
Caves.

Our minds which were once formed and informed by the brilliance of the lost person, fall away due to this loss of the great soul. “We are not so much maddened” – reveals that we are not necessarily angry though anger is a part of the feelings that can come from this loss. We feel a sense of despair more than anger. We become disheartened and crestfallen. This despair is as “cold, dark cave”. The feelings of despair are so strong within us, that we cannot even utter or speak.

7. And when great souls die,
after a period peace blooms,
slowly and always
irregularly.
Spaces fill
with a kind of

Something, electric vibration.

In between these moments of despair and anguish due to the loss of the great soul, we still begin to heal and feel peace. The feelings in between this healing are like a kind of soothing or comforting “electric vibration”. It is said to be a vibration because somewhere on the back of our mind, we can feel the pain vibrating or buzzing.

8. Our senses, restored, never
to be the same, whisper to us.
They existed. They existed.
We can be. Be and be
better. For they existed.

Yet when we recollect the memories of the lost person, they soothe and comfort us. Then eventually our senses are restored even if our restored senses are never the same. In the background of our minds, we can hear the whisper, “they existed”.

This gives new meaning to our lives and because of the presence of the lost one in our minds, we can “be better”. The ending of the poem offers great hope to all who have experienced loss. So there are grief and pain which hit us when a great or loved person die, but hope is also there which again helps us to live a new life or to revive.

When Great Trees Fall Linewise Summary

1. When great trees fall,
rocks on distant hills shudder,
lions hunker down
in tall grasses,
and even elephants
lumber after safety.

The poem “The Great Trees Fall” opens with the metaphor of the tree that falls. It symbolizes the loss of a great person. When great trees fall, it is felt for miles around. In the same way when a great soul departs, the effects are felt deep and far. The poetess says that when great trees fall, the rocks of the distant hills shudder and vibrate. The lions hide and take shelter in tall grasses. Even the big animals like elephants trudge for shelter and safety.

2. When great trees fall
in forests,
small things recoil into silence,
their senses
eroded beyond fear.

When great trees fall in the forests, not only the big animals but also the small animals rebound in silence. They are not even sure what they feel for their senses are eroded beyond fear.

3. When great souls die,
the air around us becomes
light, rare, sterile.
We breathe, briefly.
Our eyes, briefly,
see with
a hurtful clarity.

In these lines the speaker shifts from her use of metaphor by speaking directly about death. When great souls die or depart from us, the air we breathe in also seems to become “light” and “sterile”. It is hard to breathe when one has lost an important man. The speaker also describes the way in which those who are affected by loss have a short moment of “hurtful clarity” that is they are able to see and realize just what a valuable soul has departed from us.

4. Our memory, suddenly sharpened,
examines,
gnaws on kind words
unsaid,
promised walks
never taken.

When a person is hit with a great loss the person’s memory is “suddenly sharpened”. He or She is able to remember the moments once spent with the departed or the lost person. The speaker then explains the feelings of regret that one undergoes who has lost someone dear. One will sometimes regret the “kind words unsaid”. One also thinks or remembers about the walks that were once promised to be taken with the loved ones.

5. Great souls die and
our reality, bound to
them, takes leave of us.
Our souls,
dependent upon their
nurture,
now shrinks, wizened.

In this stanza,the loss of a “great soul” means the loss of a soul that had a great impact on one’s everyday life. The poetess elucidates the way,our souls were once dependent on the nurture of another, the loss of whom leaves us with a feeling of becoming small or in other words our souls shrink.

6. Our minds, formed
and informed by their
radiance, fall away.
We are not so much maddened
as reduced to the unutterable ignorance of
dark, cold
Caves.

The speaker in these lines describes the way in which our minds have been “formed and informed” by the radiance and brilliance of the great person or soul with the departure of whom, our minds seem to decline. The speaker gives an insight into the mental and emotional effects of losing someone close.

She says that though we are not so much maddened by the loss yet we have some feelings that are unutterable and ineffable. There is a feeling of despondence and despair and this feeling is described as a “cold dark cave”. Our minds are minimized to the inexpressible ‘ignorance’.

7. And when great souls die,
after a period peace blooms,
slowly and always
irregularly. Spaces fill
with a kind of
Something, electric vibration.

Through these lines, the poetess reveals that even we slowly began to heal and recover the loss with the passage of time, yet somewhere in the background of our minds we can still find the despair and anguish for our loved ones. This healing is like a soothing or comforting “electric vibration”. In other words the pain still buzz in the background but the memory of the lost dear one seems to be soothing and comforting.

8. Our senses, restored, never
to be the same, whisper to us.
They existed. They existed.
We can be. Be and be
better. For they existed.

The poetess explains that eventually our senses are restored even if they are never “to be the same,” because in the back of our minds we can hear and feel the presence of our departed loved person. We can hear the whisper “They existed”. This gives us new meaning and purpose in our life. The poetess says that because this great person existed, we can “be better”.

When Great Trees Fall Annotations and Vocabulary

Shudder — tremble convulsively; quaver
Hunker — to make oneself comfortable in a place or situation
Lumber — trudge; tramp
Recoil — rebound or spring back through force of impact or elasticity
Eroded — chipped away at; disintegrated
Clarity — clearness or lucidity as to perception or understanding
Nurture — the action or process of bringing up or fostering
Shrink — retreat; pull back
Wizened — shrivelled or wrinkled with age.
Radiance — brilliance; brightness; blaze
Unutterable — unspeakable; unable to utter or speak
Soothing — having a gentle calming effect; reducing pain or discomfort
Restored — re-established; re-installed; to bring back

Treasure Chest A Collection of ICSE Poems Workbook Answers

The Glove and the Lions Poem Summary, Theme, Critical Analysis by Leigh Haunt

The Glove and the Lions Summary by Leigh Haunt

The Glove and the Lions Poem Summary, Theme, Critical Analysis by Leigh Haunt

The Glove and the Lions Summary

The first stanza of the poem “The Glove And The Lions” by Leigh Hunt opens with the scene of King Francis’s royal court. King Francis was a vivacious, energetic king who loved a royal sport of watching the lions fight among themselves. Among his nobles were also Count de Lorge and his beautiful lady whom the king admired. Then the poet describes the violence bloodshed involved in the sport. The lions “ramped and roared” with “horrid laughing jaws.”

The king commented that it was good thing that the noblemen and women were watching from their vantage point safely, rather than being among the beasts below. The lady, Count de Lorge’s love, in order to draw attention to herself and to gain admiration and glory, threw her glove down among the lions expecting to be fetched up by the Count. We find her to be a mischievous girl who entertained the idea that her lover who was “brave as brave can be” would do anything to make her happy.

Then we find De Lorge following her plan exactly. He bowed and smiled at her before leaping into the “lions wild.” The lions were unable to touch him because of his movement which was rapid. Before anyone could react, he was back and had taken his place once again as her lover.

So far, we see everything was perfect and had gone according to her plan. Now we find a twist in the poem. De Lorge found this act of his lover offensive, annoying and derogatory. So this time we see him, not showing love to his lady.

He threw the glove in her face instead of giving it to her in a respectful manner. He stood back with bravery and valour and leaves the place. We find the Count to be a person who appeared to have a positive view of what a relationship should be or how love should be.

He realized that his lover did this more as a method to garner her attention and indulge her vanity than as a genuine attempt to have his love. So he threw the glove at her face and rejected her and her love. King Francis who watched the entire action of the Count, praised him for what he had done and added that it was not love, but vanity, that made the lady give such a task to the Count which could have killed the Count.

The Glove and the Lions About the Author Leigh Haunt

James Henry Leigh Hunt, best known as Leigh Hunt, was an English critic, essayist and poet. He was born on 19th October 1784 and died on 28th August 1859. Hunt’s first poems were published in 1801 under the title of Juvenilia, introducing him into British Literary and theatrical society. Hunt published the poem Story of Rimini in 1816.

Then again in 1818, Hunt published a collection of poems entitled Foliage followed by Hero and Leander and Bacchus and Ariadne. Hunt’s early essays were published by Edward Quin, editor and owner of The Traveller. His other works included Amyntas, A Tale of the Woods, The Seer, oc Common Places refreshed, stories from the Italian Poets etc.

Hunt’s Autobiography was revised shortly before his death, and edited by Thornton Hunt. Hunt co-founded The Examiner, a leading intellectual journal expounding radical principles. He served as the focal point of the Hampstead-based Hunt Circle which included Charles Lamb and William Hazlitt. He was the central figure of the Romantic Movement in England. He produced a large body of poetry in a variety of forms; narrative poem, satires, poetic dramas, odes, sonnets, short lyrics and translations from Greek, Roman, Italian and French poems.

The Glove and the Lions Theme

“The Glove And The Lions” by Leigh Hunt describes the precarious game of love played in the royal court of the king. It also tells us about the outcome or result of going too far in anything. It tells us how the lady who had the love of the Count De Lorge, wanted more glory and fame. So she dropped her glove in to the pit with the lions.

If the Count would have been injured or killed she would gain glory by showing how valuable her affection was to the Count. But it didn’t go that way. The Count recovered the glove and showed his bravery but then he rejected her thus the dame lost her love and respect in order to gain glory and admiration.

The Glove and the Lions Critical Analysis

The poem “The Glove And The Lions” by Leigh Hunt opens with the description of King Francis who was shown as a jovial and exuberant man. He loved a royal sport that is lion fighting. On that particular occasion, he was in his royal court watching one of his favourite sporting activities, lion fighting. He was surrounded by aristocrats, lords and ladies.

There were “nobles filling the benches” and the “ladies in their pride” Here Hunt may suggest the pride of ladies being vicious as the pride of lions fighting below them, because later in this poem we find the young maiden (the Count’s lover) showing this savagery when she dropped her glove in the pit.

Everyone was enjoying and among them was a couple that drew special attention of King Francis. In the midst of the spectacle the poet offers us a glimpse of another more personal battle- the battle of hearts between Count de Lorge and the lady whom he was attracted to. The introduction of the words like pride, gallant, valour and love offer an idea to the readers of the values upheld by the people. The lady love of the Count was the one for “whom the king sighed.”

We see that King Francis was infatuated with her who was the lover of a noble present in the King’s court. It was a spectacular show with all the brave noblemen above and the lions the royal beasts below on the arena. If we move from the centre of this poem to its plot, we are introduced with the description of the progress of the fight. The poet states that it was a “gallant thing” to see the “crowning show.” It was the royal event something which the common people would never had been able to see.

The whole stadium was filled with “valour and love” topped off by the king, who was looking down on the “royal beasts” lions below him. The “beasts” here used may be referred to both the lions and the nobles who must fight among themselves for the king’s favour. Both also symbolize power, bravery and strength. The second stanza of the poem presents a series of powerfully drawn visual images. Longfellow uses alliteration (ramped and roared) and paradox (horrid laughing jaws).

The quick movements of the beasts are shown by short verbs and the repetition of the airy/w/ sounds in “wind went with their paws.” The second stanza of the poem describes the atmosphere of the fight. The lions were quite ferocious and vicious and “ramped and roared” with “horrid laughing jaws.” They began to fight and tear one another.

Their blows were strong like “beams” and the wind seemed to move alongside their paws. The lions were rolling along on the floors and creating a serious commotion. The king from his place, was impressed by the splendidness of this moment. He was able to experience the “bloody foam” that came rushing through the air.

In a distant King Francis amusingly stated that he and those around him, were better off, “here than there” or they were better since they were not in the pit with the lions. In the third stanza we can find how the nobles chuckled at the king’s comments. One of these nobles, the lover of j Count de Lorge was specially entertained by the king’s comment.

So she immediately reacted and turned and looked at the king, then smiled with her beautiful lips and sharp bright eyes. She was perhaps struck by the grandeur and strength of the king. She suddenly felt of testing her own lover, De Lorge to see if he too was brave. She wanted to be proved right that is she wanted her lover to do wondrous things to show her love towards her.

In conclusion, she dropped her glove into the pit with the lions, hoping that De Lorge would jump and recover it for her. She wanted glory, admiration and fame by doing so. In the last stanza we see how after the glove being dropped, De Lorgesmiled at her, bowed and leaped among the savaged lions. His jump was so quick that the lions were unable to touch him. He was back with the glove to his place before anyone could react. But De Lorge we find was not amused by this.

He did not express his love instead he threw the glove at his lover’s face. King Francis praised him and stated that it was “rightly done”. So we find De Lorge having a perfect outlook on what a relationship should be or how a love relation should be. He could well realize that his lover did not actually made the gesture in the hopes of having his love but instead as a way of getting self attention and indulging her “vanity.” So he was not hesitant to reject his lover and her love which was full of vanity. King Francis said that it was not love that had set the Count a task like that, but it was her vanity that gave him so.

The Glove and the Lions Title of the Story

The poem “The Glove And The Lions” by Leigh Hunt is set in an arena where a battle between lions had been organised, in order to entertain the court, with King Francis who is described as a hearty and an energetic king and who is fond of “a royal sport”.

He was sitting down among his nobles to watch the sport. There were his courtesans, other lords and ladies. Among the nobles were also included the Count de Lorge and the one” for whom he sighed” that is the Count’s lover. From the very beginning of the poem, we see the presence of the lions who form the main reason of the spectacular show that was going on in the court.

Then the scene taking place in the pit below brings alive the sights and sounds that one would have witnessed and heard- the blows, the thunderous roars of the lions etc. All these paint a vivid picture of how the royal beasts, the lions were fighting among themselves. In the second stanza we find how the lions with “horrid laughing jaws” “ramped and roared” aloud.

They were vicious and savage. They began their fight and we see how the tore into one another flesh. Their blows were strong as beams which obviously showed their strength and power. The wind seemed to move alongside their paws. They were seen rolling around on the floor and causing serious commotion.

The lions were injured and bloody foam was seen to come whisking through the air. King Francis seeing all these commented that they were in a better place as they were not among the lions. Till now we have seen how the lions have taken an important place in the first two stanzas of the poem. The lions are the symbol of superiority and strength.

But of course the role of this scene in the poem also has a different meaning. It is not only about humans and blood sport but more to set the scene for the other aspect of human nature that the poem is really talking about- vanity, supposed glory-valued by so many feelings that really matter in the end.

Next we find how De Lorge’s lover, turned her face and smiled and reached to the conclusion of throwing a glove among the ferocious, raging lions (who are not only symbols of power and strength but also symbols of danger) in order to test her lover the Count. She aspired for glory and out of her self-conceit she set the fatal task to her lover. She did this not out of love for him. So we find her dropping the glove in the pit amongst the lions with the anticipation of retrieving the glove by her lover.

The device by which the vanity of this dame is shown in the poem is the glove itself. So the glove forms the main weapon around which the theme of the poem is based. We find how the Count with a quick jump among the lions recovered the glove of his ladylove, thereby proving his own valour and also helping his ladylove to attain glory and to gain admiration through this task.

But the lady we find though gained admiration and glory lost the Count’s love who threw the glove at his her face. Again this glove acts as a device to show hatred by the Count to his dame. This act and the attitude of the Count was praised and admired by King Francis who regarded it as “rightly done”.

We find how he ‘quotes’ that ‘vanity’ has set the Count to do fatal task like that in which he could have met death, So from the very beginning till the end, we find the two things important for the poem. The first is the “lions” without the presence of which the Count could not have showed his valour and without which the lady could not have set a task to her lover to test his love for her.

Again through the ‘lions’ and the ‘glove’ we come to know of the human nature -of the lady being callous, self-conceited, full of vanity and lastly an unpassionate lover. From this point of view we can say that this poem by Leigh Hunt has got an appropriate title of “The Glove And The Lions.”

The Glove and the Lions About the poem

The poem of Leigh Hunt deals with the dangerous game played in the royal court of King Francis who loved to watch the lions fight each other in the stadium. So one day while watching this game , he looked around , and noticed a lady sitting with the count de Lorge whom he really admired.

There was blood in the air and King Francis said that it was good that they were up and not down with the lions. The lady beside the Count, hearing the king dropped her glove into the arena among the lions. She did this with the thought that she would be admired if her Count would retrieve it for her. The Count was down and back up in a flash.

She threw it on the lady’s face and rejected her.So we find here how the lady lost her love as she wanted glory.She didn’t do that for love ,but she did that for her cwn glory and admiration for which she lost her love and also everyone’s respect.

The Glove and the Lions Main Point Of The Poem

“The Glove And The Lions”by Leigh Hunt describes the perilous games of love played in the royal court of King Francis as well as the results of going too far.The poem begins with the speaker describing the event. The king has no genuine animosity towards anyone, and his love interest has no pretended hate either.

In the poem,the poet, Leigh Hunt, wants to illustrate how love and the need for attention and approval can influence behaviour and push it beyond what might seem reasonable. The overall meaning of the poem tells how the lady was lucky to have the love of the Count,but she wanted more glory and at last lost her love. The Count rescued the glove which his ladylove threw amongst the lions but he rejected the lady’s love.

The Glove and the Lions Stanzawise Summary

Stanza – 1.

In the beginning of the poem, the poet describes King Francis as an enthusiastic and a hearty king loving a royal sport and seemed to have a decent disposition. He also gives a description of the courtesans who served him, the other aristocrats and their ladies who were all around him seated. He was watching one of his favourite sports events -lion fighting.

Among these nobles, there was a couple-Count de Lorge and his lover who was seen to capture the king’s attention. The poet describes “the nobles filling the benches” and the “ladies in their pride”. The speaker briefly steps away from the love tale that drives this short story’s plot to discuss the fight among the lions. He tells that watching the “crowning show” or a spectacular show was a gallant thing. The king was looking down on the royal creatures. The lions below him, from the top of the stadium set up which was thronged with “valour and love”

Stanza – 2.

In the second stanza, the poet gives a description of the atmosphere of the fight itself. The lions were seen to be roaring and ramping with hideous or horrid laughing mouths. They were extremely ferocious as we see them starting to lash out at one another. The blows of the lions were strong like beams and the wind seemed to move alongside their paws.

They were rolling around on the floor with choking roar. The king we find was impressed by the sublimeness of that moment. He was completely out of harm’s way but was able to experience the bloody froth or foam that came whisking through the air. We find King Francis saying that they were better where they were than the place below where the lions were fighting.

Stanza – 3.

All the nobles probably chuckled at King Francis’ comment but one of these nobles, the lover of De Lorge was specially entertained by the king’s whit. The beautiful dame with the smiling lips and her sharp bright eyes turned and looked at hirri. She suddenly felt as if she should test her lover to see if he too was “brave as brave can be” and she wanted this to be proven right and that he would do “wondrous things” to show his love to her.

She also wanted glory and admiration for herself so she decided to drop her glove amongst the lions. So we can well see that the lady was self-conceited. She was only aware of her own glory, fame and admiration. She was not aware of her lover’s safety.

Stanza – 4.

So as thought, we find the woman dropping her glove into the pit with the lions with the anticipation that her lover would jump and retrieve it for her. De Lorge also did as she intended. The maiden looked at De Lorge and smiled as if to say to bring back the glove. De Lorge jumped among these savage lions and his jump was so quick that the lions were unable to even touch him. Within no time he was back with the glove and was seated on his place. We find him not showing his love to the dame at that moment.

But he threw the glove at the lady’s face. The whole scene was observed by all those who were present there, including King Francis. King Francis praised the count and this action of the count made the king said “rightly done”. He also added that it was not love but vanity that made the lady give such a task to the count. The Count could have faced death. The task could have proved fatal to the count but the lady did not think all these because she only wanted glory and admiration for her.

The Glove and the Lions Linewise Explanation

1. King Francis was a hearty king, and loved a royal sport,
And one day as his lions fought, sat looking on the court;
The nobles filled the benches, and the ladies in their pride,
And ‘mongst them sat the Count de Lorge, with one for whom he sighed:
And truly ‘twas a gallant thing to se that crowning show,
Valour and love, and a king above, and the royal beasts below.

The poet Leigh Hunt, in his poem describes King Francis to be a hearty, exuberant and energetic king who was fond of a royal sport-lion fighting. And one day as the lions were fighting, this spectacular show was being watched by King Francis, his courtesans, other aristoctats ! lords, and ladies. The benches and all the seats were repleted with people.

Among them was a couple -Count de Lorge and his lover. As the king watched the people, De lorge’s dame captured the king’s attention. It was a very gallant and brave thing to see the show with “valour and love” or brave nobles and lords and the king above the arena and the “royal beasts”or the lions below it.

2. Ramped and roared the lions, with horrid laughing jaws;
They bit, they glared, gave blows like beams, a wind went with their paws;
With wallowing might and stifled roar they rolled on one another;
Till all the pit with sand and mane was in a thunderous smother;
The bloody foam above the bars came whisking through the air;
Said Francis then, “Faith, gentlemen, we’re better here than there.”

In the second stanza, the poet describes how the lions had been fighting among themselves. They “ramped and roared” with hideous laughing mouths or jaws. They bit one another and gave strong blows like beams. The wind appeared to be moving in step with them. They were making tremendous noise and disturbance. The bloody froth came “ whisking through the air.” Seeing this the king commented that they were better they were not among those beasts.

3. De Lorge’s love overheard the King, a beauteous lively dame
With smiling lips and sharp bright eyes, which seemed the same
She thought, the Count my lover is brave as brave can be;
He surely would do wondrous things to show his love of me;
King, ladies, lovers, all look on; the occasion is divine;
I’ll drop my glove, to prove his love; great glory will be mine.

The dame of Count De Lorge eavesdropped the comments of King Francis. With her smiling lips and acute brilliant eyes, she felt her lover who was “brave as brave can be” would surely do wondrous or marvellous things to display his love towards her. She wished this to be proven true and so she decided to throw her glove amongst the lions, which she expected to be retrieved by the Count her lover. In order to prove his love towards her and to gain glory for herself, she did this brutal action.

4. She dropped her glove, to prove his love, then looked at him and smile;
He bowed, and in a moment leaped among the lions wild:
The leap was quick, return was quick, he has regained his place,
Then threw the glove, but not with love, right in the lady’s face.
“By God!” said Francis, “rightly done!” and he rose from where he sat:
“No love,” quoth he, “but vanity, sets love a task like that.”

So the dame dropped her glove into the lion’s place to prove the Count’s love for her. She looked at him and smiled with the hope that her Count would regain the glove. De Lorge bowed and in a moment jumped among the savage, ferocious lions and returned back. The lions were even unable to touch him because of his quick movement. Before anyone could react, he was back on his seat once again.

Then he threw the glove on its owner’s face but not with love. He disliked this action of his lover because he understood the purpose of her action (throwing the glove among the lions.) He understood that she did this only for her own self glory and admiration.

This attitude of the Count was praised by King Francis who also shouted as “rightly done.” He rose from his seat and said that it was not out of love that the dame acted in that way, but it was her vanity that had set the Count to do a fatal task like that.

The Glove and the Lions Annotations and Vocabulary

Hearty — enthusiastic; energetic
Mongst — in the middle of
Sighed — emit a long, deep, audible breath expressing sadness, relief or tiredness.
Gallant — courageous; brave; heroic
Ramped — speeded up; expanded
Horrid — unpleasant; disagreeable
Wallowing — roll about or lie in mud or water
Stifled — choked; make (someone) unable to breathe properly
Thunderous — relating to or resembling thunder
Smother — suffocate
Whisking — rushing; hurrying
Wondrous — marvellous
Leaped — jumped
Regained — recovered; retrieved
Vanity — excessive pride in or admiration of one’s own appearance or achievements;
Self — conceit

Treasure Chest A Collection of ICSE Poems Workbook Answers

Treasure Chest A Collection of ICSE Poems and Short Stories Workbook Answers for Class 9 & 10

Treasure Chest A Collection of ICSE Poems and Short Stories Workbook Answers for Class 9 & 10

This Treasure Chest A Collection of ICSE Poems and Short Stories Workbook Answers for Class 9 & 10 are meant for the students, appearing for the I.C.S.C. Examination to be held in and after the year 2025. The questions have been written under immense research and studies in accordance with the standard of the school level. Each and every poem has been thoroughly explained, and it is followed by annotations, comprehensions, summary, and text-based multiple-choice questions. we shall feel amply rewarded if these answers can make the task of the learners easier and more interesting.

Treasure Chest Workbook Solutions – Treasure Chest Workbook Answers Class 9 & 10

Treasure Chest A Collection of ICSE Poems Questions and Answers

Treasure Chest A Collection of ICSE Poems Summary for Class 9 & 10

Treasure Chest A Collection of ICSE Short Stories Workbook Answers

Treasure Chest A Collection of ICSE Poems and Short Stories Workbook Answers will help students to have a better and clearer understanding of short stories pertaining to the new ICSE syllabus. Our endeavour is to make the texts interesting and easily understood. To facilitate this we have included detailed summaries, word notes, Multiple Choice Questions (MCQ), critical analysis, and solved questions. This will enable you to do self-study and guide you to write precise answers using the keywords from the texts. This will help teachers in classroom teaching, preparing question papers, and for project assignments. This Treasure Chest Workbook Solutions will be a delightful revelation for any student of literature who is keen to have a better understanding of these stories.

Treasure Chest A Collection of ICSE Short Stories Questions and Answers

Treasure Chest A Collection of ICSE Short Stories Summary for Class 9 & 10

Needless to say that ICSE students are expected to forge ahead with their skill in the use of the English language and grammar so that they may, with a solid foundation in the language, improve upon their literary expressions. Often we experience cryptic sentences and expressions in different forms of literary art; e.g. novels, short stories, poems, plays etc. when expressions become mysterious or obscure in meaning. Literary art is often unbound by the rigidity of grammatical disciplines; but then, that is the prerogative of the author and we are not meant to enjoy that liberty.

Therefore, one must be extremely careful about error-free syntax while a strict vigil should equally be maintained both in cases of spelling and paragraph formations. Above all, a student of English literature is expected to have eloquence in the art of presentation. The correctness of the answer is important.

What is equally important— is how one presents it. I mean an elegant style. It is summarily impossible, to show the sun by striking a match— stick at the corner of one’s own room. But one can light a candle or a few incense sticks to drive away a little darkness or spread a little aroma inside a dark room. Treasure Chest Workbook Solutions are intended to emit a little light as such. We sincerely believe that this Treasure Chest Workbook Answers Class 9 & 10 shall serve the purpose of the students of ICSE.